Skip to main content

Full text of "Entre Nous 1924"

See other formats




J^jutJb /O 






**p*A ™')7,/%& 



) 



Mrs. Steve C. Burton 
(Lucile Dorroh Burton) 
208 South 59 Place 
Birmingham, AL 35212 



<Uhe 

Entre Nous 





As an express-on of our admira- 
tion of his high, character, patri- 
otic citizenship, ana successful 
attainments; ana because of his 
ardent devotion to the college, 
as a loyal son of Howard, and 
his untiring efforts in behalf of 
her advancement, ive affection- 
ately dedicate this volume of 



ENTRE NOUS 

to 

tlliam Anbmu S?rnj 

A.B., '06. 




WILLIAM ANDREW BERRY 




OPDCP^BOGI^ 



CHAPTER ONE 

The College 



CHAPTER TWO 

Flic Classes 

CHAPTER THREE 

Athletics 

CHAPTER KICK 

( )rganizations 

CHAPTER FIVE 

College "V car 




■iia! 



i 



mil 



mi 

III! 



m 



& 




miiiiiiiB 

■iiiiiiiiiiis 




E 



| 




THE COLLEGE 

■ • ■ • .......„« 

For let Philosopher ana Doctor 

preach 
Of ivhat they will, and what they 

will not — each 
Is but one Link in an eternal 

Chain 
That none can shft, nor break, 

nor over-reach. 

— Rubalyal of Omar Khayam. 



CHAPTER I 



ill 






Zm 



■§&m. 



:ll§l 



???=? 



~-fc£al 



tS^Z^ 



is5^1£ 



Sx3= 



I'E 











:--.-C 





<cC' 



'€* n 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



£ uu i uii ii ii iii iiiiiii i ii i i iiii ii i ii iiii iii i ii ii ii i i iirnTnrnnnTnnnii i i i mmimii i i unmnn immor^ras f^^mmn nmm 





II 




9 W'l'njlV' 







Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



l BI T*""""" | || | | " , l | i | | ll l llll l l ll l m |iiiii m iiiiiii,i mii iniii iiii n mmimTTTmii i i i iii i iii n i i iiii i^ m 




12 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




I , „ i,., n iiiiii i iii nMi iiii iii ii iiini urn iiiiiiiiiiiiiM iiiiii i ii i niim i ^ni ii iiH ii i ii i i iiiiii i iiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiMim m^^^«i^ p *StajiiiL :[ii :.i,ii 'M i , i ir 




^ 




'3 










Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 





Ipf 



§C7 



14 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

B i ff » Ti P !i mimamuuiiniiuu'''i)"iin 




»s 



PS." 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



jhhm\% fur Hmuarfc 

Ideals for an institution of learning are necessarily both 
physical ana spiritual. 

On the physical side, it is our dream to have, in the near 
future, a practically new set of buildings which shall pos- 
sess architectural beauty and which shall be in harmony 
with the best traditions of academic construction. These 
buildings should not only be beautiful, but they should 
conform to the most modern demands in arrangement and 
equipment. 

The success of the college defends very largely wfron 
the number of its instructors and their scholastic prepara- 
tion. As the college grows, it is our j)ur{>ose to bring into 
the faculty an increasing number of teachers already suc- 
cessful m the art of instruction and in creative ability. 

It is our hof>e that the level of study and scholarship in 
our student body may be increasingly higher; that our stu- 
dents may always exercise a spirit of common honesty in 
their daily relation with each other and in their conduct 
in class and on examination; that their lives may be guided 
by a spirit of gentleness and courtesy; that they may be- 
come responsive to generous impulses and noble aspi- 
rations. 

It is our desire that Howard College may increase in 
educational spirit, and that it may become a fclace in which 
interests are created, enthusiasms kindled, love for truth in- 
spired, and where learning, rather than information, is the 

goal of the teaching. 

John C. Dawsox. 



16 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




r 



jot 







' -'■ . 4 _ i. : -a»€ffli» ' .,*** 




PRESIDENT JOHN C. DAWSON 



'7 







Entre Nous, N?neteen Twenty-four 




" """" i i i i r'i'rimijyjijgiMiiiiiiii i ii i i i iiii ii i i ii i iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiii) 111 iiikm ii ihi n 



Officers of Instruction and Administration 

College Faculty, 1923-24 



Roger \V. Allen, B.S., M.S.. A.M. 
Professoi of Chemistry 

B.S. Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1918; M.S. Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1919; M.A. 
University of Michigan, 1920; Special Graduate Work University of Illinois; Special Graduate 
Work Columbia I niversity; Member of American Chemical Society; Member oi Phi Kappa 
Phi Honor Fraternity. 



Wm. Everett Bohannon, B.Sc., A.B., A.M. 

Director of Summer S(hii<il 

B.S. Southern Normal College, 1904; A.B. (classic) Southern Normal College, 1906; Life Certifi- 
cate Graduate Western Kentucky State Normal; Institute Instructor; Author of County Educa- 
tional Survey; A.B. (psychology) Indiana State University, 1915; A.M. (education) Indiana 
State University, 1916; Graduate Student University of Chicago, 1916-17; President of Asso- 
ciation of Alabama Colleges, 1920-21 ; Professor of Education at Howard College since June 1, 1918. 



Marie Bost 

Librarian 
Librarian at Howard College since 1917. 



Percy Pratt Burns, A.B., A.M. 
Professor of English Literature 

A.B. Howard College, 1904; A.M. Harvard University, 1920; Professor in South Carolina Co- 
educational Institute, 1904-1910; Principal of Howard Academy and Acting Professor of English; 
Commandant, 1911-13 ; Graduate Student of University of Chicago, Summer Quarter, 1 9 1 3 ; 
Professor oi English at Howard College since 1912. 



James Horton Chapman, A.B., A.M.. Th.M. 
Professor of Religious Education 

A.B. University of Alabama, 1904, A.M. 1905; I'h.M. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
1908; Student at Columbia University Summer Session, 1916; Graduate Student Boston Univer- 
sity, 1917-1918; Professor of Religious Education since 1918. 



18 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



Harris G. Cope, LL.B. 
Director of Athletics 

LL.B. University of the South (Sewanee), 1902; Assistant Athletic Director, University of the 

South, 1904-1907-1908; Head Director of Athletics in Same School, 191-9-1915; Member of Na- 
tional Football Rules Committee, 1914-1915. 



John C. Dawson, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. 

President of College and Professor of Romance Languages 

A.B. Georgetown College, Kentucky, 1901; A.M. Howard College, 1910; Ph.D. in Romance 
Literatures and Languages, Graduate School of Columbia University, 1921 ; LL.D. Howard College, 
1918; Studied in France and Germany, 1 903-1907-1909 ; Instructor in French in Summer Schools 
of University of Alabama and Columbia University; Instructor in French in Extension Depart- 
ment of Columbia University, 1920-1921; American Dean at University of Toulouse, France, 
1919; Editor of Picard's "La Petite Ville", Author of "Toulouse in Renaissance," Columbia I'ni- 
versity Press, 1921 ; Professor i:i Howard College since 1921. 



Paul DeLaunay, A.B., Lic.Mt . 

Assistant Professor of French and Instructor in Piano and Pipe Organ 

Graduate University of Paris; Professor of French at Westmount College, Montreal, Canada, 1902; 
University of Virginia Summer School and William and Mary College, French Lecturer; Pro- 
fessor of French Literature University of South Carolina, 191 8, and Associate Director of French, 
Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C. ; Studied Music in Paris Conservatory under Anthiome, I.avignac, 
Massenet and others. 

Theophilus Randolph Eagles, A.R., A.M. 

Professor of Mathematics 

Atlantic Christian College, 1902-1903; A.B. University of North Carolina, 190S; Professor of 
Mathematics at Catawba College, 1908-1909; Professor of Mathematics at Bethany College, 1909- 
1910; A.M. University ol North Carolina, 1912; Instructor University ot North Carolina, 1910 
1 91 3 ; Acting President March 1 to July 1, 1919; Professor of Mathematics at Howard College 
since 191 3. 



Mrs. Carolina ENGESPHELDT 
Library Idviser 

Student Three Years in ffollins College, Virginia; Student Univer 
bia University, 1918; Graduate New York Public Libra rj School, 
Order Department of Birmingham Public Librarj since 1912. 



SltJ ol Chicago, 1917; Colum- 
1912; Head ot Catalogue and 



'9 




W "-N 



i efj** 



gpw. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



£ iqiminHpTmr i- ^^ <^^j«-_ -< 




.M. 15. Garrett, A.M.. Ph.D. 
Professor of History 

A. P.. Howard College, 1900; A.M. Howard College, 1902; Ph.D. Cornell, 1910; Assistant Univer- 
sity "t Wisconsin, 1909-10; Instructor LJniversitj ol Michigan, 1911-1915; Professor St. Lawrence 
University, 1915-1922; Prof essor oi Histor) at Howard College, 1 923-1 924. 



Mlle. Emma L. Guntzer 
Instructor in French 

Graduate at Colmar, France; Instructor at Colmar, France; Instructor at Antioch College, Yel- 
low Springs, Ohio. 

French Hawks, A.B., A.M. 
Assistant Professor of English 

Graduate of Haywood Institute, North Carolina; A.B. Meredith College, 1920; A.M. Cornel' 
University, 1921; Instructor in English and Latin at Lee Baptist Institute, Virginia, 1916-1917; 
Instructor in English and Latin at Watauga Academy, Tennessee, 1919-1920. 



G.A. Hendricks, A.M., Th.B., D.D. 
Professor of Economics and Sociology 

A.B. Howard College, 1892; A.M. Howard College, 1892; Th.B. Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, 1895; Student Union Seminary, 1902-1903; Graduate Student Columbia University, 
1 902- 1 903; Graduate Student University of Chicago, Summer Quarter of 1908-1909-1 910-191 1 ; 
D.D. Louisiana College, 1910; Professor of Social Sciences in Howard College since 1905; 
Graduate Student Universitj "I Chicago, 1921-1922. 



Sumner Albert his, A.B., S.H., S.M., I'n.D. 
Professor of Biology 

A. li. Wake Forest College, 1903; Marine Eiological Laboratory, Summer 1905; University of 
Chicago, 1907-1908; S.B. University of Chicago, 1909; S.M. University of Chicago, 1918; Pro- 
lessor ol Natural Sciences Chowan College, 1905-1909; Head of the Department of Natural 
Sciences and Professor of Biology Ouachita College, 1909-1912; Professor of Biology at Howard 
College since June, 1918; Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1922. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



i mm Minimum n ■■ III 11 I 1III1U I I 1 I HII I II ! 1 1 1 II HI I H I ] 1 1 H H IIU-LmU I 




Louis K. Oppitz, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Physics 

A.B. Yale University; Superintendent of School, Milford, Ohio; University Scholar Yale Uni- 
versity; M.A. Yale University; Superintendent of Schools, Batavia, Ohio; Professor of Mathe- 
matics and Phvsical Science Lebanon University; Assistant in Physics University of Michigan; 

Instructor of Physics University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania; Associate 
Professor of Physics, Western College for Women; Professor of Physics, College of St. Thomas, 
Minn.; Professor of Physics, Earlham College; Professor of Physics, Shorter College, Rome, Ga. ; 
Professor of Physics at Howard College since June, 1922. 



Paul C. Saunders. B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

University of Colorado, 1910-1911; Alfred University, Alfred, N. Y., 1911-1914, B.S. ; Instructor 
in Physics Cornellsville (Pa.) High School, 1914-1916; Graduate Work in Organic Chemistry 
Columbia University Summer School, 1916; Instructor in Chemistry in Milton College, Milton, 
Wis., 1916-1918; Graduate Work University of Wisconsin Summer School, 1917; Analytical 
Chemist in Smokeless Powder, du Pont Company, Delaware and Nashville, Tenn., June to De- 
cember, 1918; Instructor of Chemistry Coker College, Hartsville, S. C, 1919-1920; Instructor of 
Chemistry University of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 1920-1923; Graduate Student in Chemistry 
University of Pittsburg, 1920-1924; M.S. in June, 1922; Ph.D. in January, 1924. 



W. E. Schlilmax, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics and Scientific German 
A.M. Harvard University; Ph.D. Knox Universitj 



Bennie Simxks, A.R. 

Instructor in Romante Languages 

A.B. Howard College, 1 9 1 9 ; Instructor in Modern Languages Jefferson County High School 
Graduate Student at Columbia University Summer Session, 1922-1923. 



William Nelson Thomas, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of latin and Greek 

A.B. and A.M. Graduate of Colgate University; Postgraduate Student University of Chicago, 
1919-1922; Ph.D.; Professor of Greek and Latin Westminster College, Utah, 1 9 1 9 - 1 9 2 2 . 



21 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



Mim mm mmii i m i i ii Miii iiii Hl l iiii i iii iii H Il l ilii i ii mi"" ■ rm g 



Dr. J. A. Ward, A.B., M.D. 
Instructor in Pre Medical Course 

A.B. Howard College, 1913; M.D. Johns-Hopkins. 



Virginia Holliman, A.I?., A.M. 
Instructor in History 

A.B. University ol Alabama; A.M. University of Chicago. 



VIRGINIA Carswell, A.B. 
Head of Demonstration High School 

A.B. Howard College, 1922. 



Mrs. Jerome Vandiver, A.B. 
Head of Dramatit Department and Instructor in English 

Graduate of little Rock Normal; A.B. Due West Woman's College, S. ('. ; Graduate in Expression 
One West Woman's College; Graduate in Expression and Dramatic Art, Little Rock Conserva- 
tor} "! Music and Drama; Postgraduate Work Two Summers Morse School of Expression, St. 
Louis, Mo.; Postgraduate Work under Miss Maude Minor and Professor S. II. ("lark of Chicago 
University; Postgraduate Work toward A.M. Degree, Toledo University; Instructor in English 
in Tampa High School, Tampa, Fla.; Head of Dramatic Department of Arkansas State College; 
Head of Dramatic Department of American College of Music, Toledo, Ohio. 



FR1 D (J. WlEGAND 

Hand Master 



J. A. Moore, A.B. 

I n>t> hi tor in Chemistry 
A.B. Howard College, 1920. 



E^3 



I 









-V 


'•' 


4 ^k 


A 


% 


■>* 


m 











THE C LASSES 







Myself when young did eagerly 
frequent 

Doctor Saint and heard great 
argument 

About it and about — but ever- 
more 

Came out by the same door as in 
I went. 

— Rubaiyal of Omar Khayam. 




CHAPTER 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

£ A!..., minim iii iii n i in wM i M iiiii i i i iii n iii u i iimi i mi i iiiii i imiMi i m inmg 





SENIORS 

From The End Of The Trail. Bv James Earl Fraser 



25 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



jMaBtf i ^m i nMn jiHr liuJiuliii n illlllllllUl JriiqfipiriiTriMj]] iimnimm mi m g 



H B ■■••--♦ . • -V •:••-.•-- 






m%% 



WOSBUmm 



Senior Class 

Officers 

Fred White President 

Frank Mullins Pice-President 

Loyce Hendrix Secretary 

Ciiari.es W. Gross Treasurer 

George Yarborough Poet 

Cari.ton Lee Historian 

George Neki.y I'rop/iet 

Turner Jordan Class Editor 



a6 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

£ r l|Mi| LIIUII I MII IIII Mimi l llllllll lll M I MI III I I Hn i ll l MI I III II IIMMI I MmUlMlUllim i ll l HII I MMII II I I Ihl ll l l MlllllllUlU U^ n 




Senior CI 



ass 



George Harwell Allex, AM Birmingham, Alabama 

••Red has worked bis way through college In i lie three years that he lias been with us, 
but he wasn't so sly that we didn't learn to lil<<- him and to appreciate his wit. 

Hugh Howard Barfield, A.B., ¥ A Linevillc, A'abama 

Hugh is the kind of a fellow that can plaj football and baseball, make friends, and 
be the idni of the girls' dormitories all at the same time. 

■•11" club; Philomathlc Literary Society; V M. C, A.; Associate Editoi ol the "Crimson;" 
Member Dining Room Council; Varsity Football (:S-4); Varsity Baseball (3). 

LlLLIE Cook BARNES, A.B., ASA Birmingham, Alabama 

Although l.illie has been a quiet soil of a girl in her four years here, she has made 
many friends and great things are expected of her. 

Glee Club (!-:'•); Bhelburm Literary Society; v. w. C, A.; Ensley-Howard flub. 

Mildred Olivia Basexiierg, A.B., Z il Birmingham, Alabama 

Mildred is a girl of poise, refinement, attractive personality, who delights us at 
the piano. 

Central-Howard Club; v. w. C. a.; Shelburne Society. 

Erskixi: McKlNLEY Braswell, A. 15., 2 N Demopolis, Alabama 

"Goot" is ther Of the Old vanguard Dial has studied for the last four- years, and 

time has brought out In him one of Howard's enthusiastic students, and he rattles a drum 

among other things, 

\. U C \ . Glee Club (1-4); Soph, more Class Poet; Inning Room council i L' ) ; 
College Band (4); Pan-Hellenic Council (4). 



27 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



IIIMIMIMMlll.lllllll.lll hum I .li |i | lllllniliin m i. ) [ r ) la g 




cL-$L~ 



dt'MV '^."Ht.SpuioeonBmn 



^1 



Senior Class 
dley, A.B., <I> K X Blountsville, Alabama 

"Bo" ;is an all-around athlete, church worker, steady student, and popular fellow has 
Stood out in his lour years here. Men ol' "Bo's" calibre arc an exception rather than 
the rule. 

Varsity Football (1-2-3-4); Baseball (2-8); Captain Football (3); Student Treasurer 
of Dining Hall (ti ; Vice-President "H" club (3); Phllomathic Literary Society, 

/<3 / ?<y- Edward Lorenza Buckner, A.B Prattville, Alabama 

"Buck" is one of the most popular divines — a preacher who has mixed himself 
up in every phase of college life besides being one of the faithful few of four years. 

Divinity Club: Franklin Literary Society: Square ami Compass; Dining Hall Council; 
Treasurer Student Body CD; Student Executive Committee (4); Crimson Staff (4), 



Beatrice Caver, A.B. 



. Birmingham, Alabama 







Beatrice is a quiet, sensible sort of girl, always faithful in her tasks, and earnest in 
every respect. 

Ruth Ian Club; Shelbume Literary Society; Volunteer Band; Y. Vv\ C. A.; Central- 
Howard Club. 



/ <^7^ Eleanor Vivian Chandler, A.B Scottsboro, Alabama 



Bleanor Is the superior lype Of girl, possessing unusual ability and rare intellect. 
The ease and willingness with which she does things is destined to make her great. 

Shelbume Literary Society; Vice-President Howard Math Club; Instructor in Biology 
(8); Instructor in Math (8-4); Vice-President Tennessee Valley Club (8); President 
Woman's student Government (4). 

Ethel Ann Clark, A.B., A A II Falkville, Alab; 

According to popular vote, Ethel is the best all-'round, most Ideal, most lovable, most 
popular, and most representative girl In Howard, but it didn't take us four years to 
find ibis out 

Secretary Student Body (3); Secretary Junior class CD; President Dramatic club 
(3); President Glee Club (8); Varsity Basketball (8); Best AU-'Round Girl CD; 1'iamst 
Shelbume Literary Society; Maid Birmingham-Southern Howard Game (1-4); Voted Hest 
All-'Kound. Mosl Popular. Most Representative Co-ed i I); Student Council (4), 



28 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



£ qiiTT n Tti | |H"i"i»iHnnimTirimtnnnMiinHn i ll l ininmimiMIIIIIMMiiiiritmMiiiiii| iiiiiiiii< MH iT n nnTTminnmn: 




Senior Class 

Eschol S. Dardex, A.B Goodwater, Alabama 

■ Q/f 1^ "Zeke" comes from a town with a prohibition name, and he boasts that kind of record. 
I jH Ile lias ,jeen a good student during his lour years at Howard and everyone hates to 
— - — see him leave, 

. - «.■*"" f'h Franklin Literary society; Secretary "Six Foot Club;" Y. M. C. A.; Scrub Baseball 

A cv^ , w* Team c2 - 8) - 

Jewell Dardex, A.B Goodwater, Alabama 

Jewell is a demure little thing who has also been with " '24" less than four years. 
But everybody loves a Gem and especially old Head's. 
V. \V. C. A.; Shelburne Literary Society; Honor Roll. 

LUCILE DoRROH, A.B Kennedy, Alabama 

y Before this noble woman we are likely to stand in awe. We find in her gentility of 
. A/ffculture, broad sympathy, true loyalty and unusual depth of spirit. She makes a lasting 
„, M iSnpresalon upon all with whom she comes iii contact. 
lAi/Y 1 ^ Varsity Basketball C!-4); Chaplain Literary Society; Secretary .Mathematics Club; 

JS^ Co-ed "H" Club; Honor Roll (8-4). 

George Michael Ecoxomos, A.B Ensley, Alabama 

George is the kind of a fellow that makes both students and profs sit back and take 
notice. He knows his stuff In Greek and Science, and fortunate Indeed is the one « ho 

works next to him in Lab. 

Mary Bunn Gay, A.B., Z il Birmingham, Alabama 

Marj Bonn is all thai her nam. Implies, generous almost to a fault, genial and loving, 
with ability to make honor roll. 

Secretary v. w C \ (2 8); Bhelburne Literary Society; v. W. <". A. Cabinet; 
Ensley- 1 low ard Club. 



29 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



iLuiiiuimiJimiimmmium iiijmmm n 




ttoB&it :•>•.•. = • 






Senior Class 
D. A. GaylorDj A.B., II K A Birmingham, Alabama 

Dan Is a prince of a fellow. He lias stood out In many a game on the gridiron, 
court and diamond, and every one loves Dan. 

Varsity Football (1-8-3-4); Baseball (1-2, Captain :s ) : Manager Baseball (2); Central- 
Howard Club; Franklin Literary Society; "H" Club; Representative to National PI 
Kappa Alpha Convention al St. Louis <4). 

JL& 4/n tqqlbl^ Glen O. Gibbs, A.B., K N Ensley, Alabama 

' it-" /li ft ft n "Goggy" may have seemed peculiar to some (oiks, but that Is only the temperament 

£yT\(/X* - ^vL*-9-a < ~W4/?yi\AfAiI of " u> !U ' 1 ' st - He is some cat on the keys, but his talents are not limited tr, the piano, 
'^ / W for he is a good student, too. 

Accompanist Glee Club (2-8); Ensley-Howard Club; Treasurer Ensley-Howard Club 
(2-3); President "Target Club"; Assistant in Chemistry (3-4); College Hand (4). 

Nellie Gibbs, A.B., J V 1 Ensley, Alabama 

Nellie is one of those true blue Rirls. possessing Sterling Qualities and genuine traits 

which makes her a friend worth while. An honor roll seemed incomplete without 
her name. 

Glee Club (2-3-4); Y. W. C. a.: Ensley-Howard Club; Shelburne Literary society. 

Evoi.yn Graves, A.B.. \ T - Ensley, Alabama 

Hail to the Ktrl whose disposition Is as sunny as her hair' Friendliness and charm 

are Interwoven with depth of spirit and intellectual ability to make this rare type of girl, 

V. W. C. A. Cabinet (2-3-4); Vice-President Women's Pan-Hellenic council (2-3-4) 
Howard players (2-8-4); Secretary Howard Players (3-4); Girls" G'ee Club M-'-'-3); 
Knsley-Ho\\ aid Club ; Shelburne Literary Society; Feature Section <•! the "Entre-Nous", 
'22; "Fanny and Her Servant Problem"; Basketball i4). 

ETHEL EsTELLE GREGG, A.B Stanton, Alabama 

Ethel In her Bhorl stay here of only one year has contributed a fine fore- and quality 
to student life Met- dynamic personality Is sure to be felt wherever she goes. 

Graduate A. L. T. [., Hontevallo, "-'i ; President Woman's student Government, 'SI; 
Delegate to international Convention, his Moines, 'SI; Howard, 'S3-'S4; Honor Roll; V. W. 
C. \ ; student Mission Hand; President B. v. P. U. No. l. 

30 



M 



'A 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




Chari.i 









lenior 



CI 



ass 



A^- V ' 



4 



E Will Gross, A.B Wedowee, Alabama 

One could hardly find a man of greater loyalty than Charlie Will. His keen intellect, 
his shrewd insight and his innate love fur politics are sure to make him popular, 
especially with office-seekers. 

class Treasurer (2-4); Dining Room Council (2); Assistant Cheer Leader (1); Y. M. 
c. a.; ii r Roll 1 1-2 1 ; Phllomathtc Literary Society. 

Aileen Gullahorn, A.B., Z Q Ensley, Alabama 

- J / /> The name Aileen brings to our mind a girl of worth who has contributed much to 
V. W. and to musical life of the students. She is sure to do her part always wherever 
she goes. 

President Shelburne Literary society (4); U. R. of v. \v. C. a.; v. W. C. a. Cabinet 
(2); Secretary Woman's Pan-Hellenic Council (3-4); Editor Junior Class; Associate 
"Entre-Nous" Editor (4); Ensley-Howard Club; Accompanist Girls' Glee club. 

Jewell Hagood, A.H., A E A Birmingham, Alabama 

This Jewell of rare worth happens t.. he an Interesting:, unique, clever girl of winsome 
personality. 

Florin e Hagood, A.B., A r 2 Birmingham, Alabama 

Thai Klorine is a girl of achievement is shown by her honors, Although she earned 
her "dip" in three years, sin- found time to make varsity basketball, assistant in the 
e. location department, and to make "A's" regularly, 

v. w. c. a ; Shelburn Literary Society; Howard Players; "Fanny ami Her servant 
Problem"; Central-Howard Club; Honor Roll (1-2-8); Varsity Basketball (2-8); Captain 
Basketball (3); Secretary Co-ed "ii" Club (8); Assistant Instructor Education, (2-3); 

Junior Marshal (3), 



Albert Lee Head, A.B., 77 K A Walnut Grove. Alabi 



ama 



i has been on tin- campus long enough to play baseball, football, sing In the Quae 

ClUb, make love, and keep up his work, lie Is a log "LeagUer" in many ways. 

Varsity Football (1-2); Alternating captain Football (1); Assistant Coach (1-8); 
Varsity Baseball (1-2); Dining Room Council; President "H" Club; Phllomathlc Llterarj 
Society, Glee Club; Jazz Quartetti , Cm Hellenic Council; Bald Headed Club. 



3» 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Ttuenty-four 




Senior CI 



ass 









i 



LOYCE Vti.ma HENDRIX, A.B., \ T 1' Hartford, Alabama 

".Jap", although petite in stature, la great In achievement, as her honors Indicate. 
she is unusually amiable, upright, loyal and true, despite the fact that she Is railed a 
In-art -breaker. 

Shelburne Literary Society; V. W. C. A..; Howard Players (1-2-3-4); Secretary Howard 
players (1-2); Reporter Howard Players (1-2); Vice-President Howard Players (8-4); 
Glee Club (1-2-8); "Crimson" Staff (2-3); Secretary Senior Class; Senior Play (1); Repre- 
sentative Girls' student Council; House President Crumpton Hall; "Fanny and Her Servant 
Problem"; "Mr. Hob"; "The Scrap of Paper." 

Virginia Hill, A.B., A 1 II East Lake, Alabama 

The superior rank claims Virginia as a girl of poise, refinement, modesty, and serious- 
ness of thought, one is proud to call her friend, 

Historian Freshman Class; Sophomore Class Reporter; Vic -e- 1 'resident Shelburne Literary 

Society i •" i ; Treasurer Howard Players ( :t > ; President Pan-Hellenic council (4); Girls' 
Glee club (2-8); V. W. C A.; Feature Section "Entre-Nous", '22; Mathematics Medal 
ill, Central-Howard club; "Entre-Nous" Staff (8); "Fannj and Hei Servant Problem." 

James JARRELL, Jr., A.B., 2' A" Lineville, Alabama 

Jimmle entered four years ago and he hasn't let a college education Interfere with bis 
singing, business, and making friends. 

President Glee Club (3); Glee Club i i-'J-:s-f ) ; Phllomathic Literary Society; v. m. c. a.; 
Ho« aid Players; Business Manager "Crimson" (2); Advertising Manager "Entre-Nous" 
i L' I ; Most Popular Man c .". ) ; Pan Hellenic Council (3). 

/')'?</• TURNER JORDAN, A.B., K N Birmingham, Alabama 

Despite the fact that he is one of the laztesl in school, "Plnkey" can manage a foot- 
ball team, and turn around and edit the college paper, all the time keeping out of love. 

Manager Football (2); Editor-in-Chief "Crimson" (4); "H" Club; Treasurer Central- 
Howard club; Athletic Editor "Entre-Nous" (1-2-8); Senior class Editor (-1); Pan- 
Hellenic Council ill; Assistant Coach I :', I . 

Henry Grady Ketch um, A.B Eufaula, Alabama 

ECetchum is another one of the graduating divines. Although most of his time has 
been spent on his books, be has found time t,i preach occasionally, and hold B. V. 1'. 1". 

training BCl 1. Although a quiet and unassuming fellow, he has made man] friends 

While here. 

Divinity club; v. m, c. a ; Franklin Literal-] Society. 

32 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 

I n i iii| HiiiniiiiMi» i i i n i iu ii uiiii ii iiii i niu iiiiiii iii ii n i »i i i iii iiiiii ii HiiMii'i'ii" '"""|i i rnuM^ 




BjBl^w-.^l^L 



mum i m i'i in iii . : • 



Senior Class 



ttX$ 



Willie Hugh Kirk, A.B., J F 1' Birmingham, Alabama 

"Bill's" honors speak for her. There never has been a more industrious and depend- 
able eo-ed in old Howard than our own editor. 

Freshman Marshal; Glee Club (1-2); "Fanny and the Servant Problem" (2); Honoi 
Roll (1-2-3-4); Sophomore Marshal; French Medal r2); Secretary Sophomore Class; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet ( li ) ; Montreat Delegate t >-3 1 ; Student Council (2-S) ; Central-Howard 
Club; Head Marshal (3); President V. W. C. A. (3-4); Treasurer Howard Players (3); 
Critic Shelburne Literary Society (8); Sponsor Howard-Birmingham Southern Came (8); 
Woman's Pan-Hellenic council (3); Most Dependable Girl (4); Editor- In-Chief "Entre- 
Nous" (■(); Delegate to Indianapolis Convention. 



Samuel Graves Knowles, A.B Headland, Alabama 

Knowles, another of the lull termers, has not wasted his time in college. lie has 
entered Into every phase of college life and has done his best. 

Philomathlc Literary Society; Secretary Glee Club (3); circulation Manager "Crim- 
son" (3-4). 

J. B. LAMBERTH, A.B\, 2 N Alexander City, Alabama 



"Mutt" has made the most of ins four years in college. Tiny have 

pleasant and well put. 

Dining Room Council (4); Philomathlc Literary Society; V. M. C, a. 



■en congenial. 



Franklin Powell Lasseter, A.B., <l> K X Albertville, Alabama 

Old cupid snatched the happy Prank in his senior year, but not until he had made 
good on the football Held with his classmates and in ins classes. 

French Prize (8); Student instructor In Chemistry (4); Student Instructor Mathematics 
(4); Varsity Football H). 

Ei. lie Mae Lawley, A.B., A I // Birmingham, Alabama 

101 lie is another of the all-around girls the Class of ".'4 is turning out. She is an 
"A" girl with a handful Ol happiness with which she is generous. 

v. w. C. A.; Central-Howard Club; Sholburne Literary Society; Qirla* Qlee Club, 



3S 




W^"N 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




\3>^ Cari.tox Lee, A.B., «P J 



(enior 



CI 



ass 



^ 



V^ 



^ 






Birmingham, Alabama 

This "Romeo" knows how to sling a wicked dictionary, and uses it not only In 

cultivating his "dates", but also In pulling high grades. 

EMORY Lowrv, A.B Birmingham, Alabama 

A generous-hearted, earnest, likeable rellow, with a promising future is Lowrv. 

Frank Arthur MulLINS, A.B., II K A Clanton, Alabama 

Frank is an enthusiastic sort of chap who Will hobo his way to see a foothall game 
and turn around and announce his engagement. Besides heing a congenial fellow, Frank 
is a mighty fine cheer leader. 

Secretary and Treasurer Franklin Literary Society C!-4); Vice-Presldenl Franklin 
Literary Society CI): Assistant cheer Leader ( :s ) ; Cheer Leader (I); Dining Room Council 
(2-3-4); President Pan-Hellenic Council it); Vice-President Senior Class; Glee Club 
cL'-:i-4); Varsity Quartette c'-:i-4>; Business Manager Glee Club (8-4); Soloist Glee 
Club (4); Basketball Manager (4); "H" Club (4). 

Mildred Murray, A.B Birmingham, Alabama 

Mildred has quite a combination of talents. She regularly makes honor roll, reads 
well and "tickles the ivories." and when it ■ nines to dissecting cart li worms she doesn't 

even squeal. 

Instructor of I'hysies (4); Shcllnirne Literary Society; v. \v. c. a.; Vice-President 
Ensley-Howard Club < '■'■ » ; Honor Koii (3-4); Volunteer Band; Ruthlan Society. 

GEORGE Albert Neely, A.B., <I> K X Birmingham, Alabama 

When it comes to a brainy memory, George takes the cake. Possessed of dramatic 
ability, an excellent student and unselfish in the giving of his time and aid, George 

has made himself one of the most popular men on the campus, 

Phllomathlc Literary Society; Howard Players; class Historian (1); Class Prophet 
(4); Debating Council (8); Senior play M); Marshal ii-l'); .Math Club; Winner Latin 
Watch (2); Assistant Editor "Entre-NoUS" (4); Honor Koll (1-2-4). 

5+ 



i 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



IffiE 




10 



- ^ v Julian N 



Senior Class 
EWMANj A.B Dadeville, Alabama 



A unique fellow without whom the class would be incomplete. Julian is a witty 
Fellow of Indomitable will power. 



John Frank Norris, A.B., 2 N Birmingham, Alabama 

"Jelly" is the kind of fellow that, besides hitting them hard in football togs, hits 
everything else hard, lie is no sheik, but he has his friends and his ways. 

Sheik Club; Central-Howard Club; Philomathlc Literary Society; Football (8-4). 

Maurice Norwood, A.B Cullman, Alabama 

if you are looking for a pleasant, good-natured, accommodating chap, look up "Dutch." 
He is all that and then a little hit more, conscientious and a g l sort of sport. 

Y. M. C. A.; Philomathlc Literary Society; Scrub Football Team CD; Yellow Dog 
Club; Cullman-Howard Club. 



m^ 



Orlando Ogle, A.B., W A Albertville, Alabama 

All excellent man, a true friend, and a thorough gentleman. Orlando is sure to make 
a sueeess in this world. 



Roswell Owens, A.B., II K A Enterprise, Alabama 

"Speedy" is one of tie most popular ministerial students on the campus. He always 
wears a smile and is as industrious as they make them. Some day he will be heard from. 

Divinity club; Franklin Literary Society; Secretarj Square and Compass Club; Vice- 
President Student Body (4); student Council i :i i ; Business Manager "Entre Nous" (8); 
Glee Club c'-3). 



35 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

;,"; hum ' "■■iiiimmii im i i^ in .,, I, i i in in j ( 




Senior CI 



ass 



Ainna Ratliif, A.B Hanceville, Alabama 

Here is another of those that we arc sorry to have had tor Jusl one year, but we 
found Ainna with a sweet and charitable nature. 

Vice-President Volunteer Band ii>: Graduate Florence Normal School; Graduate 
\V. M. U. Training School, Louisville, Ky.j Ruthlan. 

Chari.es Daton Riddle, A.B. , 2W Birmingham, Alabama 

"Doc Charlie" led the class last year-. He is a good-natured chap who takes life 
none too seriously and makes friends while he Is doing it. although he is a laboratory 
instructor. 

class President (8); Pan-Hellenic Council (2-8); Phllomathlc Literary Society; v. M. 

('. A.; Central-Howard Clul>: A. 1). Smith Medal (1); Scientific- Club; Advertising .Manager 
"Entre-Nous" (3); Biology Assistant (3-4). 

Ellie Earl Sides, A.B Birmingham, Alabama 

Elite Earl is a quiet sensible girl, hard to know, but worth the finding out. 
Shelburne Literary society; v. w. c. A.: Central-Howard Club; Winner Latin Watch 
(L>); "Crimson" Reporter (8); Honor Roll. 

Carl Schoggixs, A.B Eden, Alabama 

This fellow will sing his way into your heart "il you don't watch mil." His Glee 
Club performances will always he a pleasant memory. 

Alma Smith. A.B., A 2 A Birmingham, Alabama 

Alma impresses ns as being a unique collection <■! sincerity, thoroughness and geniality. 
Y. W. C. A.; Shelburne Literary Society. 



36 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



| l| I II IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIII III IIII MI 





Senior CI 



ass 



Wjlbf 



T. E. Swearengen, A.B Birmingham, Alabama 

"T. E." is a fellow of convictions. His conscientiousness and interest make him a 
valuable asset to his chosen profession. 

Student Mission Board (1-2-3-4); Divinity Club; Reporter Divinity Club; Vice-Presi- 
dent Divinity Club; Vice-President Franklin Literary Society; Program Committee Student 
Mission Board. 

Clarence S. Thomas, A.B Birmingham, Alabama 

Clarence spends most of his time around Science Hall, which goes to prove that he is 
the old-stay-wlth-it kind, and everything else that il takes for a hard worker. 

Instructor Chemistry (2-3-4); Sophomore Marshal (3); Philomathic Literary Society; 
Scientific Society; Central-Howard Club. 

Miriam Thorxton, A.B., Jfi Birmingham, Alabama 

Miriam is a girl of sterling worth, firm of resolve, a staunch friend, a regular some- 
body at the piano, and her name always appears on the honor roll. 

Secretary Slielburne Literary Society CI); Central-Howard Club; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(1-2-3); Honor Roll; Vic- President Shelburne Literary Society. 

ROBERTA EmiLIE TRECHSEL, A.B., A T 2 Birmingham, Alabama 

"Bob" may be haughty and sassy, but after all, Bhe is a pleasant girl, and when she 

will do a thing you can count on it being done. 

"Fannie and the Servant Problem" (8); Howard Players (l-^-:ti; Glee Club (1-2-8-4) ; 
"Entre-Nous" Staff (1-2-8-4); Sim, user "Entre-Nous" c_' > ; Dramatic class (41; Vice 
President Central-Howard Club; Scientific Club; v. \v. C, a 

HILTON Ralph UPTON, A.B Magce, Mississippi 

Hilton has i vlnced us thai all thai comes oui of Mississippi is not marble. When 

It comes to publicity, be sees i lint Howard gets it. He Is a good reporter. 

Vice-President Freshman Class; "Crimson" start (1); Associate Editor "Crimson" (2); 
Annual Honor Roll (2); Assistant Editor "Entre-Nous" (8); College Publicity Man 
(1-2-8- it ; The "Delegation" (4); Philomathic Literary Society; v. w. c. a. 

37 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

"" ■^"J""'"""' ■ || | | | | " f ttV"""^ MI I IIIIIIHm i l»"" iiimiinni ii i | i m 




Senior Class 
John M. Vanderford, A.B Birmingham, Alabama 

a dependable, industrious rellow, "Vandy" does ins Imsi and does it all the time. 
Poet Freshman Class; Poet Sophomore ('lass. 

J eanette Vaughn, A.B., \ I' - Geneva, Alabama 

"Janet" comes to us from the "wire grass" country. Her sympathetic nature, high 
sens,- of honor and Individuality have won ror her a place In our hearts. Sometimes we 
wonder about her "ups and downs." 

v. W. C. A.; shelburne Literary Society; Philharmonic Orchestra, 

Rvth Wallace, A.B., \ T — Birmingham, Alabama 

Although Ward-Belmont claims her as an alumnae, Howard is glad to have the honor 
also. Ruth has a BOClable spirit, is full of common sense and has a bit of deviltry In hi r 
make-up. she Is one of the cleverest and most likeable Kills we know. 

Central-Howard eiul>; Shelburne Literary Society; Glee Club; Dramatic Club <3-4). 

Luther Weaver, A.B Eldridge, Alabama 

Luther is an energetic young "divine" who is sure to make good, His amiability 
and spirit of helpfulness has given him a definite spot In our hearts. 

Divinity Club; Square and Compass; Mission Hand; Philomathlc club. 

John L. Whortov, B.Litt Madison, Alabama 

\\V would have to look far to find a man with a more promising future. He is a 
fellow ureal in heart and mind, sympathetic In disposition, and capable of great things. 
Square and compass; Divinity Club; Mission Hand. 



38 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



| flUii l niiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiminnmmimiiiil l H II I I IIW I I IIing 




Senior Class 
Fred Hollis White, A.B., W J Birmingham, Alabama 

Look mi "Mickey" honors anil you will find out why he is the best all-around boy as 
well as the mo.st original and cleverest. When t ii «■ president calls him a genius and the 
coach calls him a Unlit, lie must be something, 

President Senior class; Business Manager "Entre-Nous" it); Editor-in-Chief of Senior 
"Crimson" (4); Junior Class Poet ; ••Crimson'- Staff (L'-:i-li; "Entre-Nous" Staff (S I ; 
Glee ciuh (3-4); Varsity Football Team (2-3); Varsity Baseball (8-4); captain Bull 
Pups (2); Central-Howard Club; Philomathlc Literary Society; Royal Chill Garglers. 

G. G. Williams, A.B Birmingham, Alabama 

Williams Is another of our idea of a hard worker who doesn't lei ihis Interfere with 
his being a pleasant, good-natured divine. 
Divinity Club. 

A. Nelson Willis. A.B., <I> K X Russellville, Alabama 

"Will" is a person who does a thing and does it well, Btudylng, preaching « > i making love. 

Franklin Literary Society; Divinity Club; Volunteer Band; Triangular Debate (2-3); 

Howard-Marlon Debate (2-3); "Crimson" staff (2); "Entre-Nous" Staff (2); Honor Roll 

(2); Marshal I :! I ; Library Assistant ( :i ) . 

GEORGE W. YaRBROUGH, A.B., *F A Lamar, Alabama 

,\s president of the student body George has mad,- an enviable success. He just even 
knows how to nn co-operation and spirit. He is studious and not a recluse; he is 
serious minded and congenial; he has the Aneness of Intellect thai enables him to Boar to 
i lie upper realms, and he has the strength of character which makes it possible for him 
io lin others to Ins plane. Howard may well be proud of this son. 

Dining Hall council i :t i ; Treasurer Debating Council i :: i ; Supervisor Junior Minstrel 
Ci); Pan-Hellenic Council; Franklin Literary Society; Boosters Club; [ntersocletj Debater 
(8); Honor Roll (8); Chairman Constitutional Committee i :'• > ; Chairman Membership 
Committee; v. M, C. A.; Vice President Franklin Llterarj Soclet] (8); Voted Brainiest 
.Man ( :: i ; Junior Marshal: chairman Auditing Committee (8); Besl Politician ill. Head 
Coach Basketball (4); Director Co-ed Athletics (9 I) Manager Bullpups (4); Athletic 
Editor "Entre-Nous" (4); Senior Class Poet; President Student Bodj (4), 

Gertrude York, A.B., A A Tl Jacksonville, Florida 

"Red" Is one of the most dependable and peppiest eo eda « •• have Her humor Is 
exceptional, and she has meant much to her class the foui years lure. We thought thai 
the Allegators would gel her when sh,- moved to Florida, but sh.- came bach to graduate 
with the besl .lass Howard ever had, 

Treasure] Bophoi ,■ Class; His an Jul Class; Junior "Crimson" Reportei . "Entn 

Nous" staff (8-4); Debating Council (8-4); Howard Players; Secretary Howard Players 

<8) v~lc< President V. W, c \ (4); "T" Cablnel (1 3 I); Girls' Student Coui louse 

President Rat lui Hall; Basket ball I 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



'arewe 



11 



Classmates, the sand is low. Time's course has run, 
And we approach the parting of the ways; 

The work and toil of four long years is done. 
And, if a smile upon our "God-speed" plays, 
Be sure 'tis but the lightning that betrays 

The deep, dark-breasted cloud that robs the sun — 

A yearning for the days that time has won — 

For what if duty here should bind us fast, 
Vet lead some forth into the world of men? 

The tie that binds is proof against the blast, 
Twas forged in the white heat of service, when 
The tests of college left us only men, 

To whom the whole wide world is not so vast, 

But what the goal may well be reached at last. 



Grip hands, the sand is out. Time's course is run. 

Let's swear by each that we will all be true; 
That Duty, Honor, Country, all in one, 

Shall ever bind us with a vow anew — 

The class united to the class be true; 
That when we meet beyond the setting sun, 
Each comrade will reward us with "Well done." 

George W. Yarbrough, Class Port. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



£ iwiniiiiiiiinimniiiiiinimuuiiuuii 




TniimiJiMina £ 



Senior Class History 




jjg|IKE the gallant knights of old who rode out in search of the Holy Grail, 
so must we soon leave on our divers pilgrimages. Seniors, now men and 
women, rulers of the land of tomorrow. From the top rung of the ladder, 
the goal of all in quest of education, we leave behind these few lines, lest ye forget 
the Class of '24. 

To recapitulate all the happenings and achievements and to specifically designate 
any one exponent in this "Wonder Class" would be a reiteration of what is gen- 
erally known. 

We are modest in that we speak not of our great achievements, but let them speak 
for themselves. A brief resume of the three years previous to this will enable one to 
trace the making of the great men and women who comprise the Class of '24. 

On a memorable September morn in 1920 the vanguard of this, now twenty-four, 
class marched on old Howard. \Ve who came started out determined and tenacious, 
but we were soon to learn that a Freshman's life was a hard one. Never letting our 
banners trail in the dust, we moved on, leaving behind records in every department 
of college life. 

"Time heals all wounds" of a Freshman, and in the process of evolution we be- 
came Sophomores. At this stage we capacitated as any good Soph should, tormenting 
the weak, but never failing to lead the way. 

Another step and then "The calm before the storm." As Juniors we lost many 
of our old standbys, but others came from far and near, filled the vacant places, and 
we pulled anchors and sailed on through stormy seas. 

Finally, we are what you see us today, Seniors in every sense of the word. Work- 
ing, winning, always leading, leaving behind memories of leaders in athletics, literary 
achievements, scholastic rewards — everything. The biggest of all Senior classes to 
date, and by far the greatest, will be known not only for its individual workers, but also 
for the success it attains through the power of unity and co-operation. 

Now as the cradle of time rocks endlessly on and on, the time comes when we 
must go. We go out into the world to make a name for ourselves and to fry and 
bring glory to our Alma Mater. To those left behind, remember this: "CARRY 
ON." There is a big task for you to do and you must be big people to do it. 

Classmates, this is our hope: May the bad we have done he forgotten, hut ma\ 
what little good we have done be remembered always. 

Ibis is the parting of our ways, so now we must go and tr\ to make histor] out 
in the world. 

Ma\ you make it there. CARLTON Im 

Historian Senior d/ass. '24. 



4« 




'■- — ^ 



mumuuur 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




Senior Prophecy 




Time 1935 

1111 did 1 dream, in 1924, thai eleven years from that date I would be traveling 
agent for the largest matrimonial bureau in the world, hut such is the case. And, 
since I hold such an important position — one- which requires :i great deal ol travel — 

I dare sa) I had had experiences thai arc denied most individuals. 

My first reallj notable achievement in mj profession was the arrangement, quite to the satis- 
faction ol both parties, for the marriage ol Hilton I pton and Jeanette Vaughn. Such a happ) 
pair the) are, too! I recent!) attended a most gracious reception at their home, and I was 
quite surprised to find that the number ol their servants included Hugh Barfield, butler, and 
I ucile Dorroh and Ruth Wallace, maids. The guests included all the members ol the Class 
ol J4 who were still in Birmingham. Grady Ketchum was there in his frock-tailed coat — 
but wh\ describe him? I simpl) have to state that he i-- pastor ol the Olive Branch Baptist 
Church. He has Luther Weaver as his assistant pastor. And Miriam Thornton — poor dear! — 
was there. She looked a- il she hadn't even smiled tor years. You know she vv as disappointed 
in love. She gave me her name and photo to include in mv newest catalogue ol "Those Who 
Would Be Wed." Mildred Basenberg is creating quite a sensation among church-goers as organist 
at the Frist Baptist Church ol Irondale. Turner Jordan and I'.volvn Crave- are proprietors 
ol the most up-to-date beauty parlor in Birmingham. I'.volvn takes jrreat pride in her latest 
"henna,'' and though Turner never applies any ol the beautifiers, he loves his work and has 
recentl) delivered a lecture on "Beaut) as an applied art." B) the way, there was one out-of- 
lown guest at the reception — lames Jarrel. The nirls used to rave about what a divine dancer 
"Jimmie" was and I ^uc-s the) were right. In I act, hi- present position proves it — he is danc- 
ing master at the "Home lor the Nearl v -Xuttv ." "Jap" Hendrix came in late and said that 
she was detained In official duties. She is scholarship editoor of the Birmingham NeViS. We 
all remember that at college she seemed to take particular interest! in a certain Ne<Wi scholarship 
boy, and no one doubts her efficienc) in her present position. 

Having m) office in New York City, I have had the privilege of meeting quite a number 
ol our former classmates in the great city. Quite often I go to the cabaret and have the supreme 
pleasure ol seeing Roberta Trcschsel and l.illie Barnes in their newest dances. On two occa- 
sions I have seen there Frank Mullins and Ethel Clark. Frank is singing lor a victrola company, 
with Ethel as accompanist. His records are wonderful. I have bought quite a number ol them 
at Kress' lor ten cents each. By the way, Lee Head was salesman there and he seemed to he 
holding his job down well — and yon should have seen the Hock ol women buying records. 
rhe women all "Hop" lor l.ee as usual, hut, say, don't von think it's time he settled down? 

lit season I attended a number ol performances ol Shakespearean plays. I was surprised 
to find a number of old friends playing in these dramas, and such heavy roles, too — Eleanor 
(handler, Marv Bunn Gay and F.llic I'.arle Sides have won lame through playing the witches 
in "Macbeth." What talent thev have and a splendid opportunit) to displa) their talent in these 
prominent roles! And don't let me tail to mention the stage success ol Bob Sheiton and Broughton 
Lambreth. The) were grave-diggers in Hamlet. Would that I, too, were a great actor! At 
a performance of Hamlet I saw, across the theater, Orlando Ogle and Willie Kirk. Oh, but 
thev were lair to t;aze upon! Thev are posing lor a fashion revue. 

I never confine myself to mv work entirely. 1 go about and trv to appear interested in many 

things. Dr. Virginia Hill, with I'.llie Mae I.awlev as assistant, has e-tablished a ureat hospital 
where thev ^ive a treatment for laughing. Thev have decided laughing is a hire and thev 
Hive all grouches a guarantee that one treatment of theirs will render them immune to laughter. 
I believe they've tried it on themselves, lor when I saw them thev were as gloom) as clouds 
on Christmas dav. Gertrude York, Jewel Ha good and Rosalie Smith arc nurses there and 

42 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



""^! 








Spurgeon B rind ley is an interne. Nellie Gibbs has done a great deal as a philanthropist. She 
has founded a "Home for Lost Cits." I can't understand the change in her. She liked "Rats" 
so well in college. 

Clarence Thomas and Mildred Murray, in collaboration, have discovered a substance that 
will cause ivory to become porous. Such a pity they didn't discover it when we were in college. 
It would have been a great help to us who are stricken with ivory domes. 

I have just seen Fred White's latest minstrel advertised. It promises to be a big hit thi- 
54 :ason. He has some good workers in his minstrel this year. They include Frank Norris, Har- 
well Allen, Erskine Braswell and Eschol Darden. 

I met Carlton Lee the other day and he began speaking in a circumlocutory and pleonastic- 
cycle of oratorical sonority — didn't you know he was compiler of the latest dictionary? In this 
dictionary he has included not only words that others know, but also those known only to 
himself. He was assisted in this work by J. B. McCollum. 

I happened to be in Washington when the Senate convened recently and whom should I see 
but Emory Lowry and Julian Newman. They are representing, respectively, Alaska and Porto 
Rico in the Senate. Buckner is working in connection with the Senate as framer of bills. The 
latest law of nation-wide importance was that proposed by Senator Lowry, prohibiting the 
chewing of gum on street cars. This group of my worthy friends took me to the theater that 
evening, and we saw Jewel Darden and Dan Gaylord starring in the latest screen version of 
"Around the World on Thirty Cents." Next day I met Miss Burns on the street — and would 
\ou believe it? She looks younger every day. I asked her how she did it and she said it was 
due to her discover) ol the Fountain of Youth. Next evening I took a taxi, which was driven 
bj Nelson Willis, and went to the opera house. I heard the first concert of the Washington 
Symphony Orchestra. Frank Lasseter was director and Glenn Gibbs, "Dutch" Norwood and 
Carl Hearn were playing, 

I was reading a few days ago that T. E. Swearengen, G. G. Williams, and J. M. Vander- 
ford were chosen to represent the United States at an international conference of the clubs for 
better treatment of husbands. Speak for yourselves, Johnnies! 

George Yarborough recently tried to sell me some stock in his brass mine — but I didn't take 
any, since I have brass of my own. 

Gross has given his entire time to making new discoveries. He has found in Borneo dinosaur's 
eggs which, he claims, are five million years old. 

I found two of our classmates in Kalamazoo. Miss Ratliffe is at the head ol the com- 
munity center work there. She loves her work. George Economos is practicing medicine there, 
and to see him swing his pill-case around you'd think he owned the world. 

Miss Gregg is living peaceably in Cleveland. She has always doted on Howards. She has 
a brother named How aid. She graduated I mm Howard, ami now — well, her better hall i- 
called Howard, also. 

Beatrice Caver i- a queen — I beg pardon — she is Mrs. King. Hut the error is quite natural, 
for I always think ot a Mr-. King as a queen. 

Craves knowle- has been putting forth ever) effort to become an inventor. At pre-ent he is 
trying to produce a noiseless SOUp-spOOn. Hut he can't decide' whether to put on brake- or a 
Milt pedal. 1 suggest that he amputate a lex-, overdeveloped lip-. 

I must not -tup without a further advertisement lor m\ alread) prosperous business. M) 
newest couple is Dayton Kiddle and Aileene Cullahome. The) were attended al their wedding 
b) Florine II a good and Alma Smith. I understand thai these also will soon set sail upon 
the sea of matrimony, 

Roswell Owen- i- a mi — iona i \ in the Fiji Islands. He i- doing a great work and he bid- 
fair to make a civilized people iii these I ijians. 

Fate has been kind to most of us. This is a partial record ol the deeds ol the Class ol '24. 
In 1945, upon request, I shall be glad to under a more accurate record. Georci Neelv. 



43 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

IMHHIhu iu uiini ii n i i ii iiii" iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i j gg a 




JUNIORS 

From The Thinker. By Rodin 



44 



J 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 





Junior Class 

Officers 

II. E. Watlington, Jk President 

Elizabeth Foster Vice-President 

[vie Pearl Ray Secretary 

J. II. Wise Class Editor 

Ih (.11 Awtrey Historian 

Hi lan Whitehead Poet 



45 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




Junior Class 



HOBART P. AMOS 
now \kd COLLEGE 



A 



Divlnltj Club; House President Dlvlnltj Club (2); 
Chairman Program Committee Phllomathlt Llterarj 
Socletj (2); President D.vlnlty Club (S); Dramatic 
Club (3) 

MILDRED ATKINSON 

LINDl H, VI VBAM \ 



HUGH HANNA AWTREY, * A 

STEELE, VLABAMA 



Athletic Bdlti 
Class. 



Junior "Crimson"; Historian Junior 



PA1 1 WILLIAM AUSTIN 

BNSLEY, VLABAMA 

FRANK BEDFORD BEST, * A 

BIRMINGHAM, AL VBAM \ 

E. 1 . BLASSINGAME, i: N 

BIRMINCH VM, ALABAMA 

ROY 1. BONNER 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Dlvlnltj Club; Phitomathlc Llterarj Society; Honot 

WILLIAM ROSS BRITTON, * K N 

VNNISTON, \l VB VM \ 
Franklin Llterarj Soi lety; K M C. A.; Si lei 

D. W. 151 RSON 

BIRMINCH VM, ALABAM \ 

i )\\ nm \ i ■iui.. Square and ' lompass. 

FRED CAR IKK, K 1 

BIRMINGHAM, VLABAMA 

Honor Man Freshman Class Vuburn; Treasurei Hobo 
Club Auburn; Secretary Central Howard Club; Presl 

.l-iu Central Howard Club < :'• i ; Pr si Sophomore 

i lass i :' i ; Assistant Football M 

(3) \ ,, . president Scientific Club (2); Brainiest Man 
i :; i . Student Delegate International Students Conven- 
t i..n (8). 



I< 



b^>^ 



46 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



■ ess 



iiii | imiiiiiiiii n ummiiiiiinMll l ll l l lllli l ili m i 




Junior Class 



ERNEST BRAXTON COSPER, 1 N 

STERRETTS, ALABAMA 

Phllomathii Literarj Society; Sh< iks Club; V. M C \ 

J. I. EDWARDS 

WILSONVILLE, ALABAMA 

Math Medal (1); Honor Roll (1-2-3); Vice-Pr 
Volunteer Band (2); Lion Tamers Club; Freshman 
Marshal; Secretary Philomathle Literary Society. 

REGINALD EESEIE EVANS 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 
Franklin Literary Society; Square and Compass Club. 

ELIZABETH FOSTER, A Z A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Winner Latin Watch (1) ; Winner Greek Watch (2); 
Sophomore Marshal; "Crimson" Staff; "Entre-Nous" 
Stall (2); Secret aiy Shelburne Literarj Society (3); 
Vice-President Central- Howard Club (2); "Entre- 
.. Historian Sophomore Class; V. W. 

\ Cabinet; Honor Roll (1-2-3); Vice-President 
Junior CIS 



\yh 



->*} 



k^ 



WILLIAM S. FULLER, * A 

DADEVILLE, ALABAMA 
(1-2-3); Band (3); Orchestra (3); V M 



Glee ''in 

C A. . Philomal In. I.ii. rary Soi ii tj 



JACKSON L. (iRECORV, II K A 

BIRMINGHAM, AI.ABAM \ 

Philomathle Literarj Society; Glee Cub (2). 
CARE HEARN, II K A 

U VLAM, AI.ABAM \ 

Glee Club. 
JAMES S. HOLBROOK 

AKRON, AI.ABAM \ 

DAISY HOOVER, Z 12 

BIKMINGII \M, \L\i: \M \ 

Woman's Pan-Hellenl< Council; V. W. C. A.; Shelburne 
Literan Society; Howard Alumni Reportei to "Crim- 
son" 



JULIAN KELLER 

EN8LEY, ILABAMA 




47 




9^^\ 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-jour 

1J w^!'" ' ' "' ||||"p|iiiiiiMiiiiiiifnii iiiiiiiii m nnnmi 





Junior Class 



LELAND (;. JOHNSON 

SAMSON, ALABAMA 

Vice-President Divinity Club < 2 i : Glee » "i u i. (2); Phll- 
omathlc Llt< i ary 801 lety; Y. W C. A. 

RUBY LITTLE, 4T2 

MORRIS, ALABAMA 

Varsity Basketball (1-2-3); Shelburne Literary so- 
ciety; Instructor in Biology 1 :'. 1 ; Vlce-Presidenl Sopho- 
more Class; Voted Be3t All-'Round Girl in the Junior 
1 Mass 1 3 1 

Sl'SIE MINTKR, A 1 A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 
Shelburne Literary Society. 

VIRGINIA CAROLYN MINTER, A Z A 

BIRMINGHAM, Al M: \M \ 

Secretarj Student Body 13); Feature Section "Entre- 
Nous" i - J 1 ; Voted Prettiest Co-ed Junior Class (3); 
Advertising Start "Entre-Nous" (2); Vice-President 
Boosters Club (2); Woman's Pan-Hellenic Council; 
Ciiis Glee Club (2); "Crimson" Stafl (2); Maid Birm- 
ingham-Howard < : :> in ■ ill; Vice-President Central- 
Howard Club Mi. Shelburne Literary Soclet) 






LOLA MAE MOODY 






BIRMINCH WI, U IBAMA 




Y. W. C. 


\ Shi Iburne Literal y Soci 


W. C. A. 


1 Cabinet. 


MARGARET McBRIDE 

1 NSl EY, Al VBAMA 




Shelburni 


Literary Society; Y. W. C. A. 


1 lent ral- 


Howard < 


'lull. 





NELL McELHENNEY, A X CI 

BIRMINGHAM, Al Ml \M A 

Slums. ir Millsaps Game; Glee Club (2); y \v C. A 
Cabinet; Shelburne Literary Society; Bj Vote the 
Prettiest Co-ed in Howard (2-S); Ensley-Howard Club. 

WILLIAM MARVIN MCCARTHY, II K A 

BIRMINGH WI. \l IB VM \ 
Varsltj Football i--3>. 

R. A. NUNNELLEY, JR., II K A 

BIRM1VCI1AM, \I \BAMA 

Football Manager (S); "H" Club; Assistant Football 
Mans ger < 1 1 . 

IRMA PARSONS, A I' i: 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (1-2); Y. W. C. A.; Shelburne Literal-} So- 
ciety ; Pan- Hellenic I '.ouni 1 



48 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 







Junior Class 



[VIE PEARL RAY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Medal in Piano (2); Dramatic Club. 

J. (i. RIDDLE 

Ut ARMANVILLE, ALABAMA 
V. M. C. A.; Franklin Literary Society. 

GEORGE R. SAXON, * K X 

TRADE, ALABAMA 
President Freshman Class; v M. C. A.; Vice-Presi- 
dent Philomathic Literary Society; President Philo- 
mathic Literary Society (2); Debating Council (2); Din- 
ing Room Council (1-2-3); Scrub Football (l-2i; Soph- 
omore Marshal; President Student Body Hi; Student 
Council i-'-ii). 

JOHN T. SIIEPPARD 

LEESBURG, ALABAMA 
Football r:i); Franklin Literary Society. 

KATHLEEN SLOAN, A V 2 

ENSLEV, ALABAMA 
Shelburne Literary Society; v. W. C. A.; Ensley-How- 
ard ''lull. 

R. B. SPEER 

XEWTON - , ALABAMA 

THELMA STACY, A T 2 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Secretary Freshman Class; Sponsor Howard-Birming- 
ham Southern Football Game (1); Coach Basketball 
(1); Captain Basketball hi; Best Girl Athlete (1); 
"Crimson" staff <1); V. \V. C. A.; Shelburne Literary 
Society; Sophomon Representative Student Council 
(L'>; President Co-ed "H" Club (2); Manager Basket- 
ball (2); Varsitj Basketball (2); Secretary and Treas- 
urer Sophomore Class; Junior Representative Student 

Council i :'■ i : Secretarj I Treasurer Central-Howard 

Club r.\i. Captain Basketball Team < 3 > ; "Entre-Nous" 
staii i :; i ; Chairman Constitution Committee (3); Ath- 
lel i«- Eld it"i Junior "l 'rlmson" (3». 

,» C. H. STEVENS, II K A 
-(X/V^ EL l'ASO, TEXAS 
Football (2-8); Basketball (3); "H" Club; Porter Ath- 
letic Cup (2); Central Howard Club; Best I king 

Man I '_' I | i Villi al- II. i\\ ard i 'lul'. 

J. JONES STEWART, 1' N 

MOBILE, At All \\t \ 

Librarian; Band: Orchestra; Philomathic Llterarj So 

clety; Dramatic Club; "Fanny ami Her Servant Prob 

i. in' 1 ; ''ill.. Scrap hi Paper." 

PERRY L. STONE 

BIRMINGH \M, \i \i: KM A 

Student Volunteer Band; Franklin Llterarj B ty; 

v m C. \ , Central Howard Club, 




49 




D ti|in|HiinrmTTT 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




ininuJlIJIlimiimi ffi pj 




Junior Class 



CLIFTON STEVENSON, II K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

WILLIAM HOWARD STUBBS, 2 N 

BIRMINGHAM, \l \V. \\1 \ 
Varsltj Football (1-2-S); Varsity Basketball (1); Var- 
sltj Baseball (2); Central Howard Club; "ll" Club; 
Phllomal hlc i liters i y Boclel j 



II. E. THOMPSON, * l< N 
ALBERTVILLE, ALABAM \ 



w*x 



^qV> 



"Entre-Nous" Staff (l)j Business Mi get Crimson" 

(2); Phllomathlc Literary Society; Y. M. C. \ 

MAYME THOMPSON 

ALBERTVILLE, ALABAM \ 
Dramatic Club; Y M. C. A.; Shelburne Literary So 
cletj 

GUSSIE QPCHURCH 

BIRMISGM \M, ALAB VM \ 
Volunteer Band; Shelburne Literary Society; V. W. C. 
a. Cabinet (2); Chaplain (2); Reporter Volunteei 
Band (2); Ruthian Society; Reporter Volunteer 
Band (3) 

ARTHUR S. WATERS 

MARION', ALABAMA 
Phllomathlc Literary Society; Student Volunteei Band; 
Dramatic I Jlub. 

II. E. WATLINGTON, JR., n K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALAB VM \ 

President Junior Class; Glee Club (1-2 S); President 
Glee Club (2); Managei Baseball (2); Athletic Coun 
ell; "Crimson" staff (2); "H" Club; Central-Howard 
Club; Phllomathlc Literary Society; J M. C. A. 

HULAN E. WHITEHEAD, ll K A 

ENSLEY, ALABAMA 
President Ensley-Howard Club c i i ; Dramatic club ill; 
"Mr. Bob" ili; Varsity Football t2); Basketball (1); 
Junior Class Poet; Phllomathlc Literary Society. 

GLADYS WHITLOCK 

UNION, SOUTH CAROLIN \ 
Shelburne Literary Society; V. W. C A. 

JAMES HENRY WISE, 2 X 

LAFAYETTE, ALABAMA 
Phllomathlc Literary Society; Y. M C. \ : Sheik Club 
(1) ; Dramatic Club (1); Vlci President Dramatic Club 
cm; Organization Editor "Entre-Nous" (2-3); Circu- 
lation Manager "Crimson" (2); Secretary Literary so- 
ciety (2); Plaj "Fanny and Her Servant Problem" 
ili-. "Scrap of Paper" (2); Honor Roll (1-2-3); Junior 
Reporter; Vlci President Pan Hellenic Council; Organi- 
zation Editor 'Entre-Nous" (S-4). 



5J 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

q .mm.rmmmn iiiiiiiiiii m i n i mum l inn 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I mmm i i i nrrriTTT 



Junior Class 



CHARLES K. WIER 

ENSLEY, ALABAMA 



W. R. WILLINGHAM 

PELL CITY, ALABAMA 



MABEL WILLOLGHBY, A T 2 

CORDON, ALABAMA 

Shelbume Literary Society; Vice-President Woman's 
Student Government; V. VV. A. Council i :: i , Howard 
Players (1-2-3); Plays (1-2-3); B. C. I. Club (1-2); 
Secretary Boosters Club (1-2); Glee Club (1-2). 



ETHEL CTRETON 

MIDWAY, ALABAMA 

Ruthian Society; V. W. C. A..; Shelbume Literary So- 
ciety; Student Volunteer Band. 



ROBERT SHELTON, * A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Captain Football; Varsity Football; Coach <iii!s Bas- 
ketball; "H" Club; Manager Baseball; Captain Base- 
ball. 



BERNICE REEVES 

JASPER, ALABAMA 

Y. w. C. a., Girls' Glee Club; Shelbume Literarj So- 
. lets . 



HOWARD S. HIGDON 

JAY, FLORIDA 

ci,. Club i I 2-3); Vice President Divlnltj <'luii < :■ > , 
Secretary Divinity Club; Vici Pre ident Volunteer 
Han. i; Treasurer Phllomathlc Literary Society; Y M. 

C. A. 




5« 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



History of the Junior Class 



iJS £J?tJ N tlic spring of '21 from the man} high schools ol the state, and even From outside the 

;.T»;3 5'" i v,:lU ' ''"' ^ :i 1 i' ui-- Senior Classes were thrown on the current ol life anil, like ships 
V - jv^-i li-.i \ iiiL; 1 1 1 < 1 r |n>it-, which have been their haven of refuge tor so long, sailed their wav 



EiM 



through uncharted seas, lor there is no chart lor the n"h ol knowledge, and their 
course must he chosen as one's ambition is intense. 

After sailing seas ol doubt and disappointment lor three long summer months, in which Jianj 
perished from the lack ol courage ami ambition, others were the victims ol fate, but those ol 
the stronger heart and greater determination at last found the rough seas behind them, and ports 
ol higher education bordering the rim ol peaceful harbors lay before them. Into these harbors 
sailed these buccaneers, but it seems that some ports were more fortunate than others in qualit] ol 
knowledge seekers obtained. Such was the case of Howard College on that bright, eventful morn- 
ing ot earl) September, 'ai, when so man] industrious, intelligent, well-meaning, but ignorant, 
Freshmen dropped anchors, and became a part of this classic old institution. We were not long 
in learning what the "put and take'' game meant to the college life — the upper student, usually 
the Sophomores, "put," and we rats did the "taking." Alter we had acclimated ourselves to 
our new surroundings and privileges, wearing rat caps, walking on the grass, no loitering on the 
campus, dodging bed slats, if possible, evading hazing with the risk of the dose being doubled, 
and main other forms ol amusement which we always enjoyed — alter it was over — it was 
estimated by the student body, that we constituted one entire class. We were informed that we 
possessed more in numbers, more in ignorance, more in petty high school dignity, more greenness, 
than am other class yet to invade such historical buildings. We were proud despite the tact that 
our "superiority" was enough to make even the most dignified professor laugh up his sleeve. 

Some of us soon found ourselves in athletic uniforms working for a berth on the teams, others 
devoted themselves to studying and making "A's;" still others did their best to exhaust Nun- 
nelly's suppl] ol soda pops, and extinguish what cigarettes that could be "bummed." The girls 
contented themselves with slyly trying to vamp the most fortunate RomeOS, the art ot vamping 
being a newly acquired weapon for defense, as well as offense, which they used to a great 
advantage. 

Among those winning varsity berths were Jesse Lackey, Toby Stiibbs, "Bull" Cooper, Ralph 
Brown, "Coyote" Roberts, Rowdy Crew, and others who saw much service on the varsity teams 
this first year. Jesse Lackey won the honor ot being the best athlete in Howard. Some dis- 
tinction! Sponsors, maids and popularity were some of our strong advertisers, and the beaut] ol 
the girls. The first vear ended with our hearty approval. However, we now realize that it is 
the Freshmen that get the rush. 

The second vear began after a three months' vacation, and passed after nine month- of 
eventful college life and study. We were sure ol ourselves. Very sure, as we felt it our 
brotherly duty to get the new "Fresh gang" started right. 

An honor roll student was no unusual personage in our class, as the number making the honor 
roll was unusually large. Our social position on the campus was as good as we ourselves had 
anticipated. The college beauty was one of us, Miss Nell Mcl'.lhennev . The best all-round 
athlete, as in our first vear, was selected from our number of qualified, Mr. "Ham" Stevens. No 
varsity squad can be named without naming stars from our clas-. lias an) other class ever had 
as much to be proud of as we? 

And, now, toward the end of our Junior year, still strong in numbers and determination to 
continue as we have started. Our years so far have been meritorious ones, with the last always 
triumphing over the one just preceding. Many of our number, once popular only in our own 
class, are in the mind- of the entire student body and faculty, as well as all true supporters of 
this grand old institution. 

"Ham" has been elected captain ot next year's football team, '24. As we are about to turn on 
the last lap of our college life, it is a source of pride 1 to all of us that, while we have been in 
college, we have not lived in the past or future, but were occupied in raising the pegs of records 
to the next notch above, as we marched abreast of old Father Time. 

luniors, no one knows us vet as we intend they shall ; we have broken records, raised standards, 
but let's not be content with this. Our last vear should be the oustanding vear, SO let's all he 
back next year, and give them the best part of our life and efforts. 'Hum.' Yes, Howard and 
the best ot Howard — the Class of '25. 

H. II. AwTREY, Historian. 



52 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 








SOPHOMORES 

From Atlas. Antique Sculpture 



53 






n gg 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-foui 





Soph 



pnomore 



CI 



ass 



WILLIAM ABBOTT, * A 

I \-ll\\ Mil, \l IB \\l \ 

Phllomathlc Llterarj Bocle'y. 
RICHARD 1 .. AI I SANDER 

BIRMINGHAM, U \li \M \ 
President Bquare and Compass; Vice President Phllo- 
mathlc Literary Society; Dlvlnltj ( tub; Volunteei Band, 

ERNEST ALLEN, * K N 

VERNON, M IB IM \ 
Glee i Hub M -' i . Be nd (2) l lolli ge I H chi itra (1 

R tei Phllomal hl< Llterarj s | i. Repi 

Bophomore Clali; iBSoclate Bidltoi ol the "Crlmaon" 
i^); v. m C a. i-i. Manager Band (2). 

MATTIE LOIS ALBERT, H T 2 

I ssl I <, , \l \i:\\i \ 

s tarj Treasurer Binslej Howard Club (2); t w 

C. a . Shelbui m Llterarj B ity. 

MARION ATKINSON 

LINDEN, AI.AliWl \ 

. Togatae; Judson Radio Club (1); Judaon (1); 

v. \v C. a.. Judson Pierian Club (1); Judson Bhel 
burnt Llterarj 6 itj I !) 

JOSIAII DOZI1 R BANCROFT, 2 N 

BIRMINCH wi, M VB VM \ 

Band, 

PAUL BARNE I I, •!■ K N 

CI 1. 1. MAN, AI All \\1 \ 

Phlloi hit Llti rarj Bocletj ; v. M. C. a . Prt 

College li I P i (2) ; Varsltj Di bal Ing T Mai h 

Medal (1); Phi Kappa N'u Scholarship Medal ill: 
Krcghman Marshal; Howard Math Club; Debating 

Council; H Roll (1) \ i tanl advertising Man- 

i "ESntri Nous" (2); Buslnesa Manager "Crln 
I i. Delegate International Student Conference 

HELEN BASS, A A II 

BESSEMER, ALABAMA 

Becrel ai j i-'i cabman < iti Bdll or Sophomoi e 

"Crimson"; Central Howard Club; Dramatic Club (2); 

Pan Hellenic Council (2); Sophomore Ed "Entre 

<Jous"; Glee C lib (1 !) Mosl Populai ' llrl Sopho 
mon ' lass. 

THELMA BATES, All 

EN8LEY, VI \i:\M \ 

Phi ii. urn. Llterarj Society; Student Counc v \v. 

i • A i 'a i i (2) i Enalej Howard Club; Clas P 

,i , i , 

JOHN ROLAND BOLEN, * l< N 

I ICKSON, \i VBAM \ 

Varsltj Football I ! I 



5» 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



B i i im i m 




iiiiiiiiniiiiiiii ii ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n i n n n 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 i hi ii ii mii p^, 



Sophomore Class 
DOUGLAS McK.INI.EY BRASWELL, 2 X 

DEMOPOLIS, ALABAMA 

Glee Club Accompanist (1-2); Quartette (1-2); Philo- 
mathlc Literary Society; Philharmonic Orchestra il). 
Sophomore Class Poei (2); College Jazz Orchestra (2). 

IRENE BRIGGS 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

HI Rl.F.Y A. BUCHANNON, * K X 

ALBERTVILLE, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (l-2t; Chorister College; B. V. P. I'., Philo- 
mathic Literary Society. 

MARION ROBY BUCKALEW, JR., 2 X 

ROANOKE, ALABAMA 

THELMA BULLINGTON, ASA 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Shelburne Literarj Society; Y. W. C .A.; Tennessee 
Valley Club. 

MARY ALICE BUSBY 

PRATT CHS', ALABAMA 

Shelburne Literarj Society; If. W. C. A.; Ens'.ey-How 
ard Club. 

JAMES L. CAMPBELL 

HEADLAND, ALABAMA 
Philomathlc Literarj Society; "Crimson" start. 



NANNIE B. CHANDLER 

DECATUR, ALABAMA 

Shelburne Literarj Society; Glee Club (1 2); Collega 
Quartette ii-:'); Tennessee Valley Club; v. W. C. A. 
Cabinet i-i. 

MAMIE CHAMBLEE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALAB Wl \ 

\. w. C. A.; Central -Howard Club; Ruthian Society; 
Shelburne Literary Society, 

VIKI. INDIA MINERVA CLARK 

BIRMINGHAM, VLABAMA 

Shelburne Literarj Society; Ruthian Society; Central 
Howard Club. 




55 



r> 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




■IMl!llMaum ^ ] MII I MM IIIlimgl. lmmn i MIIII I I ' UllillJ''"ll|""''"i"^ | " ' ||' |H B 




Soph 



phomore 



CI 



ass 



DICK CLAYTON, n K A 

BIRMINGH Wl, M IBAM \ 

Franklin Literary Society; Orchestra il 2); Hand (2); 
i ilee i Hub i 2 i . C ml ral I low ard ' !lub. 

HAZEL COBB, 7. '..> 

BNSLEY, ILABAMA 

Shelburne Mterarj Society; 5 W. C. A.; Qlee Club; 
( vin ral- How ard Club. 

15. C. (OKI R 

DADI VII I I . ILAB \M \ 

v M. < '. A ; Assistant Cheer Leader (2); Phllomathic 
Literary Society; Vlce-Presldenl Dlviniti Club. 



\V. A. CONNER 

ANDALUSIA, ALABAM \ 

JANE COOKE 

STEELE, MISSOURI 

MARGARET ELIZABETH COX, 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 



Air 



<x 



Secretary Sophomore Class (2); Judson College ill. 
Freshman Cabinet (1); Pierian Club ill; Home Eco- 
nomics Club ili; Latin Club I I I 

ERMAN LOUIE CREW, 1 \ 

GOODWATER, ALABAMA 



Glee Club (1-2); Philomathh 
(2); Y. M C. \. 



Literarj Soclet] : Band 



I I (,l NT. DAWSON, II K A 

TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA 

Varsity Baseball (1); Freshman Class Poel (1); Presl 
il. in Sophomore Class (2); Vlce-Presldenl Franklin 
Literary Society > - 1 : Assistant Cheer Leader (2); Pan- 
Hellenic Council (2); Voted Moal Popular Boj in s^iiii- 
omore Class. 

ROBERT JEP DENDY, * A 

BOAZ, ALABAMA 

Presidenl Freshman Class (1); Dramatic Club (1-2); 
Student Council (2); Varsity Football (1-2); Phllo- 
mathic Literary Society; v. M. C. \.; Pan-Hellenic 
Council; Presidenl V. M. C \ (2) 

ELSIE HOPE DILLON 

BIRMINGHAM, \l.\HAMA 



Shelburne Literary Society; v 
Howard Club. 



\V. • I • ■ i.t ral- 



56 






i 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



s~§* 




■ hi nr "i'"i"i'iimagr*>J O»-jajaia ^f!jfeag 




Soph 



pnomore 



CI 



ass 



HAZEL DISMl'KES 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Shelburne Literary Society; Central-Howard Club; V 
W. C. A. 

FLOYD FAULKNER 

OXFORD, ALABAMA 
Philomathic Literary Society; V. M. C. A. 

JOHN FINKLEA, n K A 

BUENA VISTA, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (1, 2); Y. M. C. A. (1, 2); Secretary Frank- 
lin Literary Society; President Franklin Literary So- 
ciety. 

JTLIA FINKLEA, A A II 

BUENA VISTA, ALABAMA 

Secretary Woman's Student Government (2); "Crim- 
son" Staff (2); Voted Most Youthful Co-ed (li; V. \V. 
C. A.; Glee Club (1. 2); Voted Prettiest Sophomore; 
Voted Daintiest Girl; Shelburne Literary Society. 

FRED CLEMONS FREEMAN, II K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Central-Howard Club; Drum Major Band. 

INEZ GARDNER 

IRONDALE, ALABAMA 

Ruthian Club; Volunteer Band; Y. \V. C. A.; Shel- 
burne Literary Society. 

ROY LANSING GARDNER 



q%k 



DADEVILLE, ALABAMA 
Philomathic Literary Society. 

ANNIE ELIZABETH GRAVES 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Shelburne Literary Society; Y. w. C. A.; Dramatic 

Club. 

JEWEL GRAVES, AT 2 

ENSLEY, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (1); Freshman "Entre-Nous" Editor; Fresh 
man Marshal; Freshman English Award; Basketball 
iii; Secretary Sophomore class (2); Manager Basket- 
ball (2i; Boosters Club; v. w. C. A..; "Crimson" stair 
12); shelburne Literary Society; Associate Editor 
Sophomore "Crimson"; Ensley-Howard Club, 

HORACE HALL, * A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




57 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



" ll """ 1 """" i mnr "■■ r g 




Soph 



pnomore 



CI 



ass 



WILLIE MAI HARDY, A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, \i \r.\\i \ 

tball mi; v W. C a. Cabinet; Treasurer v. W 
C \ . Glee Club (1-2); Shelburne Literary 6 
Delegate Students International Convention 

JAMES MARLIN HARRIS, A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Glee Club 111; Assistant Director Glee Club (2); Soloist 
Giee Club (2); Girls Quartet (2); V W. C A.; Shei- 
burne Literary Society; Central-Howard Club; Dramatic 
ciuii; Voted Most Original Girl 

M Mill. HARRIS 

ENSLEY, ALABAMA 

Shelburne Literarj Society; v. \v C A ; Ensley-How- 
ard Club. 

CURRY \\.\\ \l S 

CLYDE, SORTIl CAROLINA 



EVELYN NELL HERN, aha 

ENSLEY, A I \ll \M \ 

Bhelburne Literary Society; v. \v C \. Bnsles How- 
ard i'lub. 

EVELYN HIX, A A n 

BIRMINGHAM, Al ARAM \ 

"Crimson" Reporter (2); Associate Editor "Entre- 

Nous" iii; v. \v C. A ; Shelburne Literarj s. .,•,,.(> 

HELEN MILO HURLBERT, A A II 

ENSLEY, ALABAM \ 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Shelburne Literary Society; 
EtaBli y-Hon at ■ ! ( Hub. 

CARL E. HYCHE 

BESSEMER, ALABAMA 



JULIA BETH HRABOWSKI 

ENSLEY, ALABAMA 

C. THADDEUS IVY. 1 N 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA 

Philomathic Society; v. M. C \ . Tn isurei Sopho- 
more I 'lass 



y 



r 






5» 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



Sophomore Class 



EDWARD G. JACKSON. * A 

ASHPOKD, ALABAMA 

Phil«mathir Society; "Crimson" Staff. 

ANNA KENDA. A Z A 

WENONAH, ALABAMA 

Basketball (11; v. W. C A. Bbelbume Literary So- 
ciety; Bnsley-Howard Club; Class Reporter ill. 



ANDREW HENDRIX KNIGHT, II K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Franklin Literary Society; Scrub Football; Orchestra: 
Ban<l -Howard Club. 

HARRELL WALTON LITTLE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
>■. utral-Howard Club. 

FRANK LOWRV 

ONEONTA, ALABAMA 

ELIZABETH LOVD. A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, Al AB \M A 

Historl Club ■ 1 --' i. Voted Wittiest 

Co-ed (1); - Editor "Crldison'*; Voted Mosl 

Strikinc Girl (2) >r of Howard-Birmingham 
Ganre 

HOBART OZERO MAYO 

BOA/. AI.ABAM \ 



ELINOR AINU, REN, Z '.'. 

1 N LET, Al.AB \M \ 

I l"l INI McCl II AN 
CARBON HILL. ALAB \M \ 



I \ I Kl I I GOODRICH McDONOI (.11, * K N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




59 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




=3 O 




Sophomore Class 
FRANCES McNEIL, A r 2 

BIRMINCH \M. \I Ml \M V 

Shelburne LUerarj Society; v. W. C. a.: Basketball 
ili: "Crimson" Staff (I); Central-Howard Club; G 
Club (1-2). 

MARY ELIZABETH McPHERSON, Z Q 

BIRMINCH \M. AI ARAM \ 
Shelburne Literary Society; v. \v C. a.. Central- 
Howard flub. 

\v. i. MIMS 

DOTHAN, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (1); Phllomathl< Literary Society; Volun- 
Band; Treasurer Divinity Club (2). 

AUBRY STINSON MIRF.F., * A 

BIRMINCH \M. U Mi \M \ 
Pbilomatbic Literary Society; Band; Orchee 

ROARY ADLA1 MURCHISON, * K N 

EQUALITY, ALABAMA 
Phllornathic Literary Society; V. W. C. A.; Band. 

I. Ill IAN NESPERLING 

BIRMINCH \M. ALABAMA 
Shelburne Literary Society; Y. W. C A. 

FRANCIs NEWMAN, Z (1 

BIRMINGHAM, AI ABAM \ 

Glee Cub; Y. W. C v . Central-Howard <lui>: Shel- 
burne Literary Society. 

JERRY BIRR PARKS, II K A 

BRUNDIDGE, ALABAM I 
Franklin Literary Society; Glee Club (1-2); V. M. C \ 

GRACE CATHRINE PASS. All 

BLOUNTSVII IF. M Mi\M \ 
Shelburne Literary Society; Y. \v C. A. 

DeWITT PENNINGTON 

VERNON, U Ml\\t \ 
Phllornathic Literary Society; <;!<■<■ Club (1); Y. M. 

«'. A. 



6o 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 







Soph 



phomore 



CI 



ass 



STACEV PETTIS 

MADISON, ALABAMA 

Tennessee Valley Club; Shelbu Literary Society; 

V. W. C. A. 

CHARLES E. PETTY, II K A 

CULLMAN, ALABAMA 

V. M. C. A.; Philomathic Literary Society; Assistant 
Business Manager "Crimson" (2); Treasurer Student 
Bodj (2); Glee I Hub (1-2). 

CHATTAM BRENT PETTY 

COLLINSVILLE, ALABAMA 
Franklin Literary Society*; Y. M. C. A. 

EDGAR MOODY POE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
.it.iary Society; Central-Howard Club. 



Franklin 



V. M. C. A. 



JESSE GRANT PORTER 

CITRONELLE, ALABAMA 
; Bull Pups; Phi'omathic Literary Society. 



MYRTLE REEVES 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Shelburne Literary Society; V. W. C. A 
PRESTON C. ROUSE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

JAMES ELLIOTT SCARBROUGH, * A 

Ml. WILLING, ALABAMA 

y M c. A.; Philomathic Literary Society; Vice-Presi- 
dent Sophomore Clasa 

PAIL WILLIAM SCOKEL 

BIRMINCH \M, ALABAMA 

Football (2); "H" Club; Ensley-Howard Club. 

KENARD E. SHAW 

CUBA, ALABAMA 

R. \Y. STALLWORTH 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA 
Philomathic Literary Society; v. M. C. \. 

SHELDON SHEFFIELD 

1MNI HILL, ALABAMA 




6i 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



iiiiiiimi||||||iii FMimimilinii Hga g 




Sophomore Class 
NAUFLEET SUDDUTH, ATI \~J\/\ 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Secretary Central-Howard Club (1); Pianist Shelburne 
Literary Society CO; Assistant Pianist Girls' Glee Club 

i j i ; Y. w. i\ A.; Girls' Glee Club 1 i--> ; Vlce-Presldenl 
Junior Music Study club il>; President Junior Music 

Study <'iui> (-')• 

CHARLES R. TALIAFERRO 

EVERGREEN, ALABAMA 

GERTRUDE B. TIDWELL 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Shelburne Literary Society; v. W. C \ 

LOITSE WALL, A 2 A 

HUNTSV1LLE, ALABAM \ 

Tennessee Valley Club; Shelburne Literary Society; 
V. W. C A. 

RAYBIRN L. WEAR, * A 

ASHBURN, GEORGIA 

Tennessee Valley club; Philomathtc club. 
HUEY THOMAS WELLS, <1> K N 

BOAZ, ALABAMA 
V. M. C. A.; Band; Hull Pups; Franklin Lil 
Society. 

ORTLLA WHATLEV 

WYI.AM, ALABAMA 
Ensley-Howard Club; Y. W. C. A.; Shelburne Literary 



t^ 



\<A\ 



Society. 



HELEN WHITE, A 7. A 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 
Central-Howard Club; T. W. C. \ . Dramatic Club; 
Shelburne Literary Society. 

VIOLETT WII.HITE 

FAIRFIELD, ALABAMA 
Ensley-Howard Club; v. W. C. A.; Volunteei Band; 
Shelburne Literary Society. 

KATHERIN'E LOWMAN WILKING, 4T2 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Shelburne Literary Society 1 2 i : Y. W. C k B.S \" 
nual siarT; Y. W C. \ Cabinet B.S.; Basketball 
B.S : Biological Socletj B.S 

ROBERT HARDIE BRADFORD, * A 

UNIONTOWN, ALABAMA 
Phllomathic Llterarj Society. 

CORNELIA HANI IN. /. Q 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

BURTON DOWELL, * A, K i: 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 



6.2 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 





Sophomore Class History 



fefRpvjX that august day of September 5, 1922, the largest class of "rats" that 
KgjifcJ Howard had ever had gathered together. We were green, yet fresh in our 
[fe5 *Sa[ greenness. Nothing fazed us, nothing daunted us, and under the leader- 
ship of Jep Dendy, who was then an apple-cheeked country lad, our class pressed 
forward and made itself heard from on the campus. 

The most honored distinction which we received on the campus was winning the 
prize "stunt night," in which all of us strutted our greenness. 

We parted in tears last spring, and the only comfort we had during the wither- 
ing months of summer was that next fall we would meet again on the old stamping 
ground. 

We did meet with the same enthusiasm of our Freshman year. We are Sopho- 
mores now and we have changed, yes, changed, for we realize the seriousness and 
the responsibility placed upon us as being shining examples for the "rats," and far 
be it from us to err in any way, so that by our erring a young and innocent mouse 
might go astray. 

We are particularly proud of "us" that made letters in fooball — Jep Dendy, 
Fogus Williams and "Big Tink" (Tinklepaugh). Then, too, Fred Freeman is the 
first band major of Howard. Two from our ranks have distinguished themselves 
by their piety, and were selected, with two others, to represent Howard in Indianapolis 
at the Student Volunteer Convention. We were represented by Bill Hardy and 
Paul Barnett. 

We are all talented and have had notoriety many times before, but we're just 
too modest to catalog all of 'em. In fact, we feel, along with the rest of the school 
and faculty, that the college would simply go to the "dogs" without us. 

Elizabeth Lovd, Historian. 



Sophomore Class Poem 



To thee, dear Howard, we will pledge 

Anew, allegiance true, 
Thy standards to uphold for aye, 

Thine ideals e'er pursue. 



United we will follow thee, 
For thee all honors gain, 

Ne'er satisfied to cease to fight 
If one unclaimed remain. 



Like knights of old, by Arthur led, 
Who formed the table round, 

We'll ne'er break faith, but eagerly 
Thy praises always sound. 

Douglas M. Hraswell. 



63 



' \ 



-^m r 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 





FRESHMEN 

From Meditation. By Ghiloni 



6+ 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




% 






Fresh 



resnman 



ci 



ass 



Officers 

Harold Tinklepauch President 

Frank Pierce Vice-President 

Mildred Hay Secretary 

Lent Brewster Class Editor 

Mayer V. Newfield Poet 

James Dillard Historian 



The Ship of Knowledge 

Dedicated (with apologies) to the Class of '27. 

There's a wondrous ship sailing on through the sea 

And it is heavily laden for Postivitv. 

Through seas, ever changing from calm to storm, 

l J a vt snags of Oppression, of Hatred, and Wrong; 

'Round the rocks ol Oblivion, the banks ot Despair, 

Weathering chill blasts of Distrust that sweep through the air; 

Onward and onward, scarce turned from her course, 

Sails the good ship of Knowledge, from his heaven-born source; 

Through the dark seas of Ignorance she sails on and on, 

With her cargo so precious she weathers each storm. 

Y^et her crew's ever changing, and her pilot. Old Age 

Must relinquish the helm soon, having cancelled his wage. 

'The world, then, beckons — beckons to all, 

Hear it, O, Classmates — answer the call! 

Mayer U. Newfield, Freshman Class Poet. 



65 







9 ggggjJ^^i.iN^.^ , 4 h ^i<.' -,**_".»*■ 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-jour 





Freshman CI 



ass 



LAl'RA CHAPMAN ADAMS 

BIRMINGHAM, ALAB VM \ 

PHILLIP HAYDEN ALFORD, II K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

HAROLD BASCOMB ALLEN 

I WSLEY, ALABAM \ 

JOSEPH WALTER AVERY 

DOTH \N, ALAB \M \ 

ALFRED L. BAINS, * ^ 

ONEON1 \, AIM) \M \ 

EDWIN' M. BANDY, 1 N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 

EMMA AGNES HARLOW, A g \ 

REPTC-N, ALABAMA 

ALTON LAFAYETTE BARTON, $ K N 

TALLADEGA, ALABAMA 

OSCAR LEON BENTLEY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

MARY ETHEL BOND 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

ASHER SENOR BRAGAN, JR., Z X 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

CLAUD M. BREWSTER, * A 

HOLLYWOOD, ALABAMA 

LENT S. BREWSTER, * A 

HOLLYWOOD, ALABAMA 

WILLIAM NCTT BURCHFIELD, 1 N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

L. E. CARROLL 

SLOCOMB, ALABAM \ 



66 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



reshma 



n CI 



ass 



WILEY CASEY, n K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

HORTON B. CHAMBLEE, * K N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

JOHN M. CHAPPELLE, * K N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

ALFRED MAJOR CHILTON 

ANNISTON, ALABAMA 

EVELYN DOROTH/ CLARK, A A II 

FAULKVILLE, ALABAMA 

LACY COWART, 2 N 

HALEYVILLE, ALABAMA 

GERTRUDE CROMWELL 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

RENA CRUCE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

ARTHUR S. DANIEL, 2 N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

LOUIS ANTOINETTE DAVITT 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

JAMES EDGAR DILLARD, JR., * A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

LOUISE P. DOUGLAS, ASA 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

W. B. DOUGLAS, •!• K N 

HUNTSVILI.E, ALABAMA 

ROBERT C. EASON 

ELECTRIC, ALABAMA 

MAJOR WATT ESPEY 

HEADLAND, ALABAMA 




6 7 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



MiimiiiHnm i i i iiimiimi ii M i nium ""i"""'ii i iii i i i mm ii ii i mih g 




Freshman Class 



A. II. EUBANK, i \ 

BNSLEY, U IBAM \ 

LESSIE FITTS 
BIRMINGHAM, \l \B nn 

CLEMON GEORGE FRI I MAN, * A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 

O. M. FOX 
COLLBRAN, ALABAMA 

FRANCIS FRAZIFR, ASA 
BIRMINGHAM, ALAB VM \ 

ROSALIE GILBERT 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 

EDITH (.FISLER 

ADCER, ALABAMA 

HENRY GRADY GREEN 

CLAYTON, ALABAMA 

ROY CURTIS GREEN 

WEHADKEE, ALABAMA 

ALAN PASSMORE GRUBBS 

CIA'S TON', ALABAMA 

LOTTIS GAY HANDLEY 

JASPER, ALABAMA 

MALCOLM HARDY, * A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 

VICTOR C. HARWOOD 

PRATT CITY, ALABAM \ 

JOHN WESLEY HAYNES, JR. 

TALLADEGA, ALABAM \ 

JULIAN HAYES 

CENTERVILLE, ALABAM \ 



68 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



■ / * c ^! . 








Freshman CI 



ass 



CHARLES AUBREY HEARN 

ALBERTVILLE, ALABAMA 

CLAUDE R. HEARN, 4> K N 

DAWSON, TEXAS 

LILLY MAE HARRIS 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

CHARLES E. HENDERSON, * K N 

CULLMAN, ALABAMA 

RUPERT S. HICKS 

BRENT, ALABAMA 

ZELPHIA MAE HICKS 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

KELLORAY HILL, A V 2 

SL'LLIGENT, ALABAMA 

MARY NELLE HOLLEY, Z tl 

POWDERLY, ALABAMA 

LAFAYETTE KELLEY, * K N 

ELDRIDGE, ALABAMA 

TOM CRITTENDON KELLY 

JASPER, TENNESSEE 

JOHN WILLIAM KENDRICK 

MCCALLA, ALABAMA 

J. D. KERNEY, II K A 

MORGANFIEI.l), KENTUCKY 

MALLA JANE KETCHAM, A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

EDWIN J. LAMBERTH, JR., 2 X 

ALEXANDER CUV, ALABAMA 

JOHN MILTON LANGLEY, * A 

SVLACALGA, ALABAMA 




6 9 




V^"-s 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




iiiimiiiiiiiiniinfmnm | 




Freshman CI 



ass 



NANNIK HOPE LEE 

GADSDEN, ALABAMA 

NEEDHAM CLARENCE LEE, * K N 

LOUISVILLE, ALABAMA 

RALPH K. I.I N HOP, * A 
SELMA, ALABAM \ 

MAZIE EVELYN LITTLE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

JOHN II. LOLLAR, :: N 

JASPER, ALABAMA 

JESSE POWELL Ll'CAS 

MALOVE, ALABAMA 

CHARLES G. MANASCO, * K N 

JASPER, ALABAMA 

MARY LOU MARTIN, /. i> 

TRUSSVILLE, ALABAMA 

ADILEE MATTISON 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

MILDRED <.;. MERCHANT 

BIRMINGH \M, ALABAM \ 

ELOISE MILLSTEAD, A r A 

BOYLES, ALABAMA 

MARY LEE MORRISON, Z V. 

TRUSSVILLE, U IB \M \ 

WILLIAM IIARK'i MOSS 

CAMDEN, ALABAM \ 

ALTON LAUNCELOT MURPHY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

WILLIE KATHLEEN McCORMACK 

QUINTON, \l IBAMA 



70 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 








reshma 



n CI 



ass 



ALBERT HAVDEN McDANAL, * A 

SIPSV, ALABAMA 

NELL KATHLEEN McDOWELL 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

GRACE McGAUGHEY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

NELL VIRGINIA McMURRAV 

FAIRFIELD, ALABAMA 

MARY EMMA McPHAlL 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

MAYER ULLMAN NEWFIELD 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

LUCIAN NEWMAN 

DADEVILLE, ALABAMA 

BROWNIE EDWARD NICHOLS 

BRENT, ALABAMA 

RUTH MARION PACE, A A II 

HERRIN, ILLINOIS 

MARGARET G. FERRYMAN, A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

CHRISLER RANSON 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

PAULINE RAY, Z Q 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

OPEL MAZETA REED 

QUINTON, ALABAMA 

CHESTER DAVIS RHODES 

OXFORD, ALABAMA 

JAUNITA ROBINETTE, ASA 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




71 




Mm 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiuenty-four 





reshma 



n CI 



ass 



MARY OCTAVIA ROBINSON 
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA 

HENRY CALVIN ROGERS 

RAGLANI), ALABAMA 

GEORGE M ERR ITT ROGERS 

MORRIS, ALABAMA 

ELIZABETH SADLER, /. '..' 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

HELEN EDITH SANDERS 

BESSEMER, ALABAMA 

IRA SALTER 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

VERA SCOTT 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

HENDERSON HOWELL SELF, JR. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

ARNICE BERTHA SHELTON, Z <> 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

ROY SHELTON, * A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

MARY EDNA SHIRLEY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

KATIIERINE SINIARD 

COI.LINSV1LI.E, ALABAMA 

CHARLES WILLIAM SMITH, 1 N 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALABAMA 

KATIE ELIZABETH SMITH 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

OLIN T. SMITH, Z X 

GOODWATER, ALABAMA 



7* 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 








Freshman CI 



ass 



THOMAS OVERTON SMITH, JR. 

WILSONVILLE, ALABAMA 

GEORGE KNOX SPEARMAN 

WMSTON, ALABAMA 

HENRY PHILLIPS SPIER 

GREENVILLE, ALABAMA 

WYETH HOPE SPIER 

GREENVILLE, ALABAMA 

FLETCHER HAGOOD SPICER 

ANDALUSIA, ALABAMA 

JEWELL HARNETT SPIGENER 

WETL'MPKA, ALABAMA 

CLARENCE VIOLA SPRADLING 

TARRENT, ALABAMA 

CHARLES HARTLEY STARKEY 

BRIDGEPORT, ALABAMA 

M. V. STEADHAM 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

ELIZABETH STEVENSON, A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

J. A. THAMES 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

H. M. THOMAS 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 

MARY E. THOMAS 
BIRMINGHAM, Alabama 

J. A.TIMMERMAN 

ECl K I IC, ALABAMA 

MILDRED HAY, /. '.'. 

ENSLEY, ALABAM \ 




7} 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




Freshman CI 



ass 



HAROLD TINKLEPAUGH, ll \< A 

I ssl EV, ALABAM \ 

J. B. VAUGHN 

HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA 

ALICE VIM S 

BIRMINGHAM, ALAB \M \ 

L G. WALKER, * K N 

I ICKSON, ALAB KM \ 

VIRGINIA WALL, A H A 

M IDISON, ALAB \M A 

EDGAR P. WALLIS, JR., Z N 

SELMA, Al Mi \M \ 

CLYDE THOMAS WARREN, * A 

SYLACAUGA, ALABAMA 

DOIGLAS WEBB, II K A 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 

FRANK EARL WEBB 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

PAIL HENRY WA ILLY 

BIRMINGHAM, Al IB IM \ 

W. A. WIGGINS 

JACKSON', ALABAM V 

MORION DE WOODY WILKINSON, 
* K X 

DECATUR, ALABAMA 

WALTER OTIS WOOLLY 
MORGAN SPRINGS, ALABAMA 

EARLE TING1 I 1 

BIRMINGH \M, ALABAM \ 

CLARENCE TIDWELL 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 

JOHN COOK 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAM \ 



74 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 




Freshman Class History 




IIIS Freshman Class of 'z^-'z^. goes down on record as a history-producing set. We 
no doubt do things and do them in a big way. As for the bigness of things, ask the 
Sophomores if big, slimy remarks are not the things we "ain't got nothing else ex- 
cept?" At least that is what we heard. In fact, all the upper classmen say that the 
air becomes very warm when we approach, due to our largeness in the vocal capacity. Never- 
theless we Freshmen realize the necessity of a lengthy line since we are good for nothing but to 
talk. They say Rats don't know enough to come out of a rain — so there you are. 

However, in spite of our excessive noise, the Rats of this year are making progress. Our 
meetings up to date have been a very enjoyable feature of the year. At various and appointed 
times we have met to discuss the whys and wherefores. We have been ably led in these meetings 
by our most able and efficient president, Harold Tinklepaugh. The Freshman Class under 
Tinklepaugh's leadership has grown till it now represents the largest Rat class in the history of 
Howard College. One of these meetings took place on the historical afternoon when the Whose 
Who Delegation was elected. We elected to our Whose Who Staff talents in the many modes 
of character and endeavor, ranging from the biggest "two-timer" on down to the most "hearty- 
eater." 

One of the achievements of the Freshman Class of this year was to edit an edition of the 
Crimson. We Freshmen especially are convinced that this edition of the Crimson will stand high 
\\ hen the reckoning comes to determine which class put out the best edition of the Crimson. 
What could have been more appropriate for this issue than to have had it printed on that good 
old ignorance-signifying "green" paper? 

The social side of the class has been very highly and enjoyably upheld. One instance will 
serve to explain, that of the Kid Party. The party was held at Miss Margaret Perryman's home, 
which was skillfully decorated in Howard's colors. Such popular juvenile games, as hide-and- 
seek, pinning Buster Brown's tie on, and the circus were enjoyed to the utmost. 

The next, or rather the most important event in our year, was the Bulldog-Panther scrap. 
Although the crowd could be detected, that glorious color scheme of Red and Blue perched on 
top of our domes in the shape of Rat caps. Down there on that field fought the best football team 
Howard has ever had and we shall never forget the wonderful spirit they showed on that 
memorable day. 

But one day sad news reached the camp. One of our most prominent and seemingly influential 
co-eds joined the ever-increasing army of matrimony. Poor thing, another girl gone wrong! 
Quite a few on this most sorrowful day were seen carrying tear absorbers, lamenting the loss 
of our Freshman. 

By the way of parenthesis, they say that another marriage has taken place or is about to take 
place. Whether this is so or not I couldn't say. Who will tell the straight of the matter? 
Here's wishing all of our brother Freshmen who are adventuring into this storms sea the "best 
o' luck," and like the colored preacher we all say, "What de good Lord hab jined assunder, let 
no man put togedder." 

As a climax to the Freshmen events of this term, "stunt night" takes its place. The stunt 
was executed in high-class order by all those taking part. Miss Ilavnes greath aided the Rats 
in the big showing made on this night. 

Truly the Freshman Class has lived up to its reputation of attempting and doing big tasks. 

Jamks E. Dillaro, Jr., 
Historian Freshman ('lass. 



75 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



liwiii^nir Bnuiuumofcfc 



. -.*j ii 



Freshman Class Prophecy 




l ST as the muddj water of the Saone mingles with the clear water of the 
Rhone when the\ flow together at Lyon until one is lost in the other so 
the members ot the Freshman Class ot '24 have come together from various 
places to form the greatest class that Howard College has ever known. For one 
year we have watched each member of the class develop in a way which differs 
from each ot the other two hundred members. Such love has grown up between us 
that now, as 1 sit and ga/.e into the crystal in which 1 see reflected the future of each 
member of our class, my heart is tilled with mingled joy and sadness; joy because, 
in looking into the future, 1 see reflected the success with which each member of out- 
class has met and the renown which they have brought to our .Alma Mater; sadness 
because the time which we may spend together is all to short. 

Hut let us put away these useless thoughts and devote our attention to the future 
of our class as it is reflected in the crystal. 

There they are — the men wearing the Howard sweaters. These men, having 
starred with the varsity or Bull Pups in '23, will be responsible for the downfall ot 
the Panther in '24, '25 and '26. 

Ah! whom do we see slowly approaching now? It can only be the ministerial 
students of '24. These men who are now doctors of divinity appear as noted pastors, 
evangelists, and missionaries. But one is missing. What could be the cause? Poor 
fellow. He felt called to be a special missionary to the women. He survived onlj 
a short time. 

Hut our dear old class will be famous in other ways, too. Our students are as 
famous in 1934 as in 1924. Indeed, one of them has soared to the sublime height of 
being president of Howard College. He seems to be filling "Long John's" shoes very 
well except that he is not yet bald and his largest dimension extends in a direction 
which is at right angles to that in which Dr. Dawson's extends. 

Of course, the women must have a place. Each of them is famous in her line. 
One young lady, famous for dimples, has just made public her special method of manu- 
facturing them. .Many of the flappers who have now reached the zipper age are 
zipping just as hard as they (lapped in '24. Put one of them stands out above all 
others. What could she have done? Easy enough. She married one of those Howard 
jellies. He is now employed as a model at Pizitz. 

Oh, those Howard politicians. I see two ot them here raising a big fuss about 
an election. Both are running for mayor of Irondale. 

Some one seems to be missing. Oh, yes, there he is. The one original Howard 
sheik. He returned to Howard in 1934 to take postgraduate work in the campus course. 



76 






^?*£S§SS 



: m 



™=±££ 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 




3& A^f J 





79 




t r\ 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 





Our Coaches 

Harris G. Cope, who directs the kennel of Bulldogs at Howard, came to us 
from the mountains of Tennessee, where he had for many years trained and handled 
the Sewanee Tigers. He spent nearly half of his life as a student, football player, 
assistant coach and head coach at Sewanee. He it was who created those famous Tiger 
teams which held undisputed supremacy in the South for many seasons. Since com- 
ing to Howard he has won the heart of every student and has turned out the best 
team that Howard has ever had. Small in size, large at heart, a clean sportsman, 
and a gentleman — that's Harris G. Cope. 

Robert Taylor Dobbins, for four years an All-Southern tackle at Sewanee, came 
to Howard with Coach Cope, under whom he played for four years. Having been 
captain of one of Sewanee's most famous teams, he knew how to lead men. As a 
line coach he has but few superiors in the South. Everyone knows how that line held 
against such teams as Auburn, Union, and Vanderbilt. Who will ever forget that 
o-o tie with Mississippi A. & M.? 

With these splendid men at Howard we expect to continue to turn out better 
teams until Howard becomes one of the ranking colleges in the South in an ath- 
letic way. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



£ I I III I II I II II I I I IH I IIII II IM IIIIIII 





Here's to you, Dick Nunnelly! We know that you were by far the best football manager 
that Howard has had in many a moon. If any manager deserves to wear the "H" you do. 
Your head certainly contains something besides air and sawdust. We are proud of you and the 
success of your schedule financially. No man could have done more because you did your duty 
and that covers the territory like hot sand covers a desert. 



The Cheer Leaders and Managers 

Many of us never stop to think about the important part these boys play in a successful season. 
Last fall it was the comment of the entire college that Howard had the "Peppiest" gang ever 
corralled at the institution. How many of us ever stopped to think who was back of this great 
spirit? Frank, (Jene, C'oker and Braswell — all of them were the great source of inspiration. 
At times we were prone to become forgetful and negligent, but they never let up; they never 
went to sleep on the job. Who can ever torget that yelling on the day of the Millsaps game? 
Rain, mud and everything to chill one's spine, but the old pep was there and these boys succeeded 
in getting the best yelling out of the entire season. Every time the team left here they were 
given a send-off. These are only a few ot the things that these hoys have done this year. No 
college anywhere could boast of better cheer leaders and we hope to see some of them back on 
the job this fall. 



81 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-foia 



muimi ^iuuJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIi ,„„„ i| ,||| iliiii iiilli j iiii m i m n 




ITTil— — iimi f ~ iwiwi w — i— — ■■■!■■■!■■ i ■iiiMMii—iigtBi mmtm miaiwii— i— gai wmii 

BOB SHELTON (Captain) /,'„,/ 

Gaze upon him, gentle reader, for he is a terror. He ha* sent more men out of 
the game bj his deadlj tackling than all the real of the team pul togethei 
He played the greatest games of his career agalnsl Southern In '22 and '23. llis 
place will be Maid to fill. No better end has ever worn the Crimson and niu.-. 

"Snake" Bains Guard, Tackle or Center 

"Snake" is about the mos( useful member 01 the squad. He Is an excellent 
tackier, a dependable guard, and lias had an entire season ai center while ai 

Jacksonville State Normal. He played g I consistent football all the season and 

proved to i"- one of the mainstays of the lint-. 

Ill GH BARFIELD Tackle 

"Barefeet" hails from Llneville, from whence came the "Bonners," Rip Reagan 

and others who have 1 1-. .<l famous Southern grldii s Hugh has made a name 

for himself at Howard. He lights all the time and is a last, haul tackier. He 
is. perhaps, the world's champion "Sleep Miss.,." However, he Is one ol the 
best tackles Howard has evei had. 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



£ I i i mi uiii i i i mu iiiii nmin i nnr.i iii nim i n ii u i u iiii ii i ii ii i mhn mmmi 





Ham Stevens (Captain-Elect) Quarterback (All-State) 

Here is the gentleman with the educated toe He Is dearly beloved over on "Sun- 
shine Slopes" because of tins ract. We have scored fifteen points on Birmingham- 
Southern in the past two seasons. Ham scored them every one. His ability 
as a field general won for him All-State quarter this season. He is on.- of the 
best punters In the South and a dangerous broken-field runner. As captain of the 
Bulldogs for 1924, Ham lias the greatest year of his career before him. 

Russell Tinklepaugh ("Tink") Quarter and Halfback 

Little "Tink" is one of the most versatile players on the squad as well as one 
of the most popular. He is fast and heady on the 1 5 • - 1 . 1 and inns the team like a 
veteran at quarter. He is the smallest player on the squad, but has plenty of 
gri( ami never quits fighting. This marks the end of his second season. 

"Goose" Williams End 

in Williams, Howard has a dependable end. He is also a good center. All last 
s.ason "Coos." was troubled with Injuries. Fate was more kind t" him tins 
season, and "Goose" is now the proud wearer of tin- Crimson "H." 

Tory Stubbs ("Mule") Guard 

Here In is. Toby the turbulent, otherwise known as "Mule" Stubbs, ami along 
with all this ho is just about the best guard of ins sizo in tin- entire South. His 
work, ever since coming to Howard, has been of the stellar variety. 





Pi 



UBX 



i£^? 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 




Jep Dendy Tackle 

Jep'a Uiii't' has been his "Jonah" sine- the middle ol last season, but he played 
wonderful ball tins season. His work In the Southern and Chattanooga games 
was excellent. He is a hard worker and has two years more In which to perfect 
tlit- good work he has begun. 

"Bj" BrindleY (Unlet 

This season was "Bo's" last season as a Bulldog. Pour years he has been an 
outstanding man cm Howard's teams. No cleaner man or harder lighter ever 
donned the Crimson and Blue, lie- was last year's captain and a good one. We 
shall ever remember him for the great work he has done tor Howard. 

Frank Lassfter . Tackle 

Who was it that said. "If at first you don't succeed?" Frank is the hardest 
working member "f the team. He studies the game and keeps on his toes. 
Besides this he wins prizes for scholarship, etc. Prank is a good football player. 
one who knows the game, and Is a dandy student as well. 

Frank Xorris End 

They called him '■.Icily" and laughed when he- came out last year for end. 
How many saw this same Jelly spilling Interference, outrunning punts, hitting 

them tor losses on off-tackle plays? !!<• Is conceded to I ne of the neatest little 

ends any ol' the- smaller colleges turned out the past season. This Is Frank's 
second year on the team. 



•A.- !/T' _ / 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

| h |i h|m i i i in ii i i M ii i i n i milMii i ni i m ii i i i iiili li i iimii i mi t mmgg 




Marvin McCarthy Full and Half 

Boy, page the hero of the season. In practically every game of the season the 
work of this hoy has been the center of comment. He is the hardest hitting 
little man on anybody's football team. Running low and hard with an uncanny 
knack for finding openings, "Mac" has been the best bet of the year for needed 
yardage. His Improvement over last season has been little short of phenomenal. 

"Fatty" Brooks Guard 

Hire he is. ladies and gentlemen, the largest man on Cope's squad. The biggest 
Bulldog of the lot. "Fatty" hails from Cullman, where he received his high 
school training. His playing has been gocd, and by the time his fourth year 
at Howard comes around, he should be a guard who will be hard to handle. 

Fred White Half 

Fred broke into football fame last year against Southern, where his wonderful 
punting was the main reason for that 9-7 victory. He is a hard worker at all 
times, and is perhaps the fastest member of the backfield. He is fast and aggres- 
sive, always in the game. 

Lollar Fullback 

dollar comes from Walker County, too, and his punting and ability to plunge a 
line won for him a place on (he regular line-up. His work on the defense 
has been the delight of the coaches. He has three) more seasons. 





Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



BSjWM MIUIUUMlUittlUMiyjunuiUiuiiiii riTTiTT 






"Hi l.l." SPICER Guard 

"Bull" came to us from Andalusia. He began to attract attention from the very 
start. He has played good ball all (he year Perhaps he was at his besl against 
Auburn. This Is ins flrsi year al Howard. 

"Polly" Scokei //«// 

"Polly" came to us From Enslej High and «;is a member <>r the Bullpups For a 
while. His work againsl Etowah High was so u"<m| thai he was placed in the 
regular line-up for thi remainder ol the season. I i « - Is by far the best side-stepper 
mi the team, :ui<l with the coming season should cause would-be tacklers a lol 
of worry. 

Claud Brewster Cento 

Claud cainr to us He. in wills Taylor, where he served as captain. He showed up 
well for a, new man. In the games he played he showed himself to be a cleat 
headed, aggressive player. llis passing was well done "ii drj and wet fields. 



Dan ( I wi.ord 



Halfback 



Dan lias worn the Crimson and Blue for quite a while. He Is an all-'round man. 
Hi' lias starred <»n the gridiron, on the diamond and "ii the basketball floor for 
Ole Howard He Is the fastest man Howard has on any of her teams. A frac- 
tured wrist handicapped him this season, but he tendered good - i 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmim 




nnmniKuiiTT^niiigzii 



Football Resume 



\^a\ rrrvt ' ' I- season of 1923-1924 opened with more men out in uniform than had ever reported 
tad rV*l '" l ' le historv of athletics at Howard. The majority of this material was green and 
'?r''l Xr^ji ,l required a lot of work to whip the men into shape. The season opened with Marion 
on the campus. The cadets played a good game and only weakened toward the 
close of the game. Taking advantage of this, the Bulldogs pushed over three touchdowns for 
their first victory. 

The following week the Bulldogs journeyed up to Sewanee and took on the Sewanee Tigers 
at home. Neither team was able to score a touchdown. Howard outplayed the Tigers in the 
first half and would doubtless have scored a touchdown hut for a fumble on Sewanee's six- 
yard line. 

The Bulldogs, bruised and torn though they were, on the following Saturday, took on Variety 
at Nashville. They covered themselves with glory by holding the South's greatest team to 
four touchdowns. 

Early in October, with many injured, the Bulldogs encountered the Tiger of the Plains. 
Auburn found herself helpless around ends and through the line, hence she turned to the air. 
With a green backfield on the defense several of the passes were good for touchdowns. 

Following the Auburn game we met the Choctaws at Jackson, Miss. Everyone remembers 
the trick Dame Fortune played on us in the last minute of the game. It might happen again in 
a thousand years, but who believes it would? 

The Bulldogs then journeyed up to Tennessee and engaged Joe Guyon's Unionites in one ot 
the greatest games of the season. Penalties cost us a touchdown and twice the ball was on 
Union's five-yard line. To our delight and the sport writers' surprise, the game ended in a 
0-0 tie, with Howard very much on top. 

The team came home to meet the Millsaps Mayors at Rickwood. The weather man got hostile 
and rain fell in torrents. The Bulldogs proved to be water-hounds as well. They splashed and 
slashed their way to a 13-6 victory in spite of the mud and water. 

The following week found us in Anniston to engage the Jacksonville Normalites in battle. 
Having held Birmingham-Southern to a tie, they were anxious to do even worse with us. How- 
ever, we gave them a nice little lesson in the rudiments ot scientific football and they departed 
sadder, sorer, and wiser. 

Ip to Chattanooga next to try our skill at snake charming, for the Chattanooga Moccasins had 
been untamed at that time. It was a mean fight those Bulldogs and snakes put up. Many 
Moccasins were tamed in one afternoon, but several Bulldogs returned to the kennel with swollen 
jowb: and closed eyes as a result of the encounter. 

After having played three of the South's greatest teams, after having traveled over 3,000 
miles, after having suffered many injuries, we found ourselves at Rickwood on November 24 
to face the Panthers in "The Marne of Football." Never in the history of two schools have two 
teams fought harder. Fumbles cost both teams possible victory. It was a wonder game Iroiu 
all angles. Who ever heard ot a (>-<> tie where all the points were made In the field goal route? 
Then no two men ever played a greater game lor Howard than Norris and Captain Slulton. 
We did not lose; neither did we win, but we fought a great fight. It ha-- been a great season. 
With the same coach, most of this year's material returning and with the "Genial" Ham to lead, 
who expects anything but a great season lor the coming year? 



87 










Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




I H II I i n i iniii i i iii imiiii i i i i ii i ii ' n[imi p - r u t 



Bulldog Scores 



Howard 19; Marion o 

Howard 2; Sewanee 3 

Howard o; Yanderbilt 27 

Howard o; Auburn 30 

Howard 3; Miss. College 7 

Howard 13; Millsaps 6 

Howard 27; Jacksonville Normal o 

Howard o; Union University o 

Howard o; Chattanooga University o 

Howard 6; Birmingham-Southern 6 

Howard 70; Opponents 79 

It is hard to believe when you see such opponents as Yandv and Auburn. Hut it's true just 

the same. We had a fighting team, a righting coach, and we fought all the way. That is why 
the above result is true. 



The Bullpups 



C"5?T^?3ITH an abundance of material on hand, a reserve tram was 
I'AM organized this year and games were arranged with the leading 
EaJ fflySa high school teams over the state. After \ arhrough's illness, 
following the Sewanee game, he was placed in charge of the team. The 
"Bullpups" defeated some of the strongest teams in the state. 

Every member of the team deserves a great deal of praise for the 
good work done. However, to Ford at quarter, Tinklepaugh H. at 
half and to Starky and Brewster on the line must go the majority of 
the honor for the success of the season Wells at center was an aggres 
sive, enthusiastic player who gave a good account of himself in every 
game played. 

As this is the first time much attention has been given to the Hull- 
pups, it is hoped that, with added material from year to year, they will 
become strong enough to arrange a schedule with other college teams 
of like standing. 

The record of the Bullpups appears below: 

Bullpups 9; Fayette High o 

Bullpups 6; Walker County High o 

Bullpups 24; Etowah County High o 

Bullpups 6; Woodlawn High 7 

Bullpups o; Cullman High 20 



Bullpups 45; Opponents 



27 



SS 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 






£ H i m ! iniiiiiii I ill miniiMiiiiillll l ll ll l i m i llll lll lill ll liM I MiMi mm ii iM i iU iiiiiiiiiiiinii "mMU» 








ETHEL CLARK 
MAID 
MOVWRD-e'HAM. SOUTHERN 



ELLIE MAE LAWLEY 
MAID 

HOWARD -B'HAM. SOUTHERN 



89 



> 



m -n. 



M "^ 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




90 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



p fl|i" l "'" i imiii i mii ii iimin ii muumn i iiini i ui i iM ii n" " ' mmm 




l."5*^»l 




M 



en s 



Basketball 



George W. Yarbrouch, Coach; Frank Mullins, Manager 



Si u BBS, Captain Center 

Stevens Forward 

Scokel Forward 

Wells Guard 

Barfield Guard 



Wear Guard 

Darden Forward 

Murchison Guard 

Lowrv Guard 

Knight Forward 



Howard 25 

Howard 34 

Howard 18 

Howard 29 

Howard 40 

Howard 18 

Howard 17 

Howard 18 

Howard 38 

Howard 31 

Howard 24 



Record 

B. A. C 36 

B. A. C 36 

Jacksonville 32 

Ft. Benning 24 

Columbus "V" 49 

Mercer 31 

Albany "V" 34 

Trinity 38 

Birmingham-Southern 27 

Birmingham-Southern 29 

Wofford 25 



Howard 292; Opponents 

Games played, 1 1 ; games won, 3 ; games lost, 8. 



361 



91 



5K*^ 



' -^ 



.^OtdzZ. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

BBsa wj i mmu! 1 '" " iim """ i nfUf" i"""""T iBiBini t 



R 



esume 




FTER ;i two year vacation it was decided to again put our a basketball team. 
Immediately after the holidays a call tor candidates was sent out. Since 
Freshmen were not eligible under the new ruling of the S. 1. A. A., onlj 
about fifteen men reported. Of these Stubbs was the only letter man to report. 
Coach , i arbrough set the men to work in dead earnest and the above squad was 
soon selected. Stubbs was chosen as captain and real work began. Handicapped 
by lack of a floor on which to practice regularly, the team developed rather slowly. 
The opening game was with the B. A. C. In this game the team showed up tairlv 
T.ell. In a tew weeks it developed into a fast aggressive team. In the second game 
with the B. A. C. they clearly outfought and outplayed their more experienced op- 
ponents. 

On the only road trip of the season they met and defeated the strong fort Benning 
team, and gave the Albany ,r Y " one of the hottest tights of their career. The Albany 
papers stated that Howard had the fastest "fightingest" team that had ever played 
on their court. 

The team came home from their Georgia invasion and met their ancient rivals, 
Birmingham-Southern, at the B. A. C, and easily licked their weaker opponents by a 
score of 38 to 27. On Friday night of the same week a second game was played at 
the B. A. C. For the first ten minutes Howard played rings around the Panthers, 
but Wells and Scokel were forced from the game by personal fouls, and from then 
on to the end it was one of the hectic battles one often reads about. With only twenty- 
five seconds to play and with Southern leading, 28 to 27, Howard made a last effort. 
The tip went from Stubbs to Stevens, who shot tor the basket, being fouled in the 
attempt. The goal was counted and Stevens shot one of the free throws. So we 
came away all the gladder over victory, knowing that with our regular line-up in 
we were much better than Southern. 

The team then entered the tournament at Macon, drawing Wofford from South 
Carolina. The game was the hottest of the tournament. After one of the gamest 
fights a Howard team ever made, Wofford won by a 25 to 24 score. 

The playing of Bar field and Stubbs was a matter of much comment throughout 
the season. Stevens, Scokel and Wear should develop into fine players with the 
coming season. Huey Wells, at running guard, was the find of the season. With 
three more years before him, he should develop into the best guard in the South. 

The season was not a huge success, neither was it a failure, because the Bulldog 
licked the Panther and he licked him good and hard. In fact, he just chewed him to 
a fraz/.le. And when that has been done by a Howard team, who would call it 
a failure? 



92 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




Reserve Basketball Team 



"Snake" Bains Coach 

Gene Dawson Forward 

Frank Lowry Forward 

'Rat" Wolley Center, Guard 

Lank Hugenschmidt Center 

Oi.in Smith Guard, Forward 

"Rat" Spier Guard 



93 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



muiii i i i i i iN i iii i i i i ii i ii ni i i i niHi"'i»'»mi |i n"imii'ii'" g 




94 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



9 mem 




H Club 



Officers 

Dan- Gaylord President 

Jep Dendy Vice-President 

Hugh Barfield Secretary 

Bo Brindley Treasurer 



Members 



Lee Head 
Frank Lassiter 
Toby Stubbs 
Ham Stevens 
Turner Jordan 
Paul Scokel 
Hugh Barfield 
Bob Sh elto.v 
Frank Norris 
Huey Wells 
Gene Dawson 
Frank Mullins 
Dan Gaylord 
Rayburn Wear 



Andrew Knight 
Marvin McCarthy 
Russell Tinklepaugh 
Bo Brindley 
Fred White 
John Lollar 
Lafayette Kelley 
Jep Dendy 
Claude Brewster 
Fletcher Spicer 
J. E. Bains 
Brooks 

R. A. Nunnelley, Jr. 
F. Williams 



95 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 




' ""inn i iHn i gjjjj^" i, v ' '"" ""iiu"'"""" ,j """ii 'limit n 




Thelma Stacy (Captain) Forward 

For three seasons Thelma has been the outstanding star in co-ed athletics at 
Howard. She has the honor of having coached and put out Howard's first co-ed 
team, which, by the way, made a great record. She is an excellent shot, a beau- 
tiful dribbler, and an all-'round good floor man. Her loss, through an operation, 
in the last Birmingham-Southern game, was sorely felt. She has twice captained 
the co-eds, and everyone loves her. She knows the game and plays it as she knows it. 

"Poco" Little Guard and Forward 

Here is the hardest working girl on the team. She never quits. Her guarding is 
good at all times, and she has a good eye for the basket which makes her a valuable 
asset to the team. Mer work against Southern was exceptionally good. She has 
another vear in which to star for Howard. 



96 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

£ ,ii li ii i i iii iii i i iii ii i ii i M ii mmmTmnTTTnTTTTmrmTTTiTi i iii ii iM i i ii iiiiiiiu' i'jj; 'N|iiiTmTT 













Jewel Graves (Manager) Forward 

Jewel is the only southpaw of the squad. She has been a hard worker for two 
years and has learned a great deal about the game. The next two seasons should 
see her develop into a good all-'round basketball player. Her work as manager the 
past season has been excellent. She deserves a lot of credit for what she has accom- 
plished. 

Mary L. Martin Guard and Forward 

This was Martin's first year to wear the Blue and Crimson. She is a wonderful 
player. Her floor work has been the comment of the season. She is good on long 
shots and dribbles well. In the last game with Birmingham-Southern she was 
everywhere at one time and scored nine of Howard's thirteen points. She should 
develop into a great player before she leaves Howard. 

Catherine WlLKINS Guard 

Catherine is another member of the team who is serving her first year. She came to 
Howard from Birmingham-Southern, where she was a member of the varsity squad. 
She is one of the best floor men of the entire team. She covers well and breaks 
quickly. l'luse qualities, together with her ability to hit the basket, make her a 
valuable member of the team. 



97 



. ~> 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

° mm * ::Jttaa ^ r 'S! !,'",'t!!.""" 1 " """""""" n ' r"T'^r^""\ ' """" i""iuimm i Hm.n !! m :inn a 




Evelyx Graves Guard 

This season will be Evelyn's last as a member of the basketball team. She has been 
consistent in her work and has played some good games in her time. She is a 
willing worker and a very dependable guard. It will be hard to find one to take 
her place who will be as consistent in her work at all times. 

Fran'ces McNeii Center 

Teams come and go, but Frances continues to get the tip as usual. She plays the 
floor well and in an aggressive style. Her shooting is not so good, but another 
season should see her develop into a fine all-'round player. Her work has been 
promising all the season and next year Howard should have a fine center in Frances. 

LUCILE DoRROH Guard 

Lucile has seen two years of service. One at center and one at guard. Her great 
defensive work helped cut down many a score. She works hard all the time, and 
never fails to be in her place when needed. She deserves more credit than may be 
given her here. 



98 



i 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twentyfour 

£ [[HI m i l I Hill i IIIIII I I HI lll l llllli mnlMymj I lMI II Jjjl"! imrnrnmrnirmirn^ 





Thelma Stacy 
Captain 



Bob Sh elton 
Coach 



Jewel Graves 
Business Manager 



R 



esume 



Basketball Is about the only form of athletics that girls may participate in at Howard or else- 
where. For three years the girls have labored under every imaginable handicap ami have turned 
out some creditable teams. In 1921, under the coaching of Thelma Stacy, the girls had a very suc- 
cessful season and developed a fine team, one that easily defeated Birmingham-Southern. Last 
season, as well as this, others have tried their hand at coaching the girls, but have not been so 
successful. This year the girls had a fine team, but played only a few games. In their two games 
with Birmingham-Southern they flashed a great defense. Just before the second game they lost 
the services of Captain Stacy, who is considered one of the best players in the South. Notwith- 
standing this loss, the team gave Southern one of the hardest fights ever witnessed in Birmingham 
between girls. The final whistle found the score 14 to 18 in favor of the Southern Co-eds, Martin, 
for Howard, was the outstanding star for both teams, scoring a total of nine points for the game 
The girl is fast and shoots well. As this is her first year at Howard, she should develop into a great 
player before her college career is ended. Much might bo said of Sadler. Dorrough and Little. They 
are aggressive players and hard fighters. McNeil at center out.iumps all her opponents and. is rapidly 
developing into a fine player. While the team has not won so many victories, yet they have fought 
all the way. all the time and everyone is justly proud of them. With but few losses and new 
material to come in, Howard should have one of the strongest teams in the entire country. We 
an' lor you, co-eds. Go get them, 

one thing has been outstanding about the co-eds and that urn' thing has been their lighting 
spirit. They never quit. No higher compliment was ever paid a Howard team than this from the 
"Birmingham News" in its recent review of the last game with Southern: 

••Showing oiir ul the greatest spit its that a bulldog team, man or girl, has ever had. the blur 
clad girls from Howard fought their hearts mil. Bach lime with their o.lds against them, their 
captain and crack shot out of the game, they fought fiercely and well. They wire not beaten, 
only outsioi ill." 



99 









as 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-foui 



^^. 





RSEBfiLL 



R 



esume 

When Boli Shelton made that long running catch, 
retiring the side, in the ninth inning of the last game 
with the Southern, the curtain fell on the season. It was 
a splendid play and a fitting close of a splendid season. 
Coach ("ope has earlier in the year shown Howard 
supporters his ability as a coach by turning the tables in 
football. So early in February some twenty-odd men re- 
ported on Berry Field for try-out. Among these were 
several veterans of other seasons. There was "Boiler 
Maker" Alford, Jess Lackey, Boh Shelton, Bo Brindley and 
others who had worn the Crimson and Blue in other 
days. Along with these veterans were such high school 
Stars as Gene Dawson, All-State selection, at second base; 
"Funk" Cox, one of the best catchers in South Alabama, 
and last, but not least, Hugh Barfield, the "Babe Ruth" 
of Lineville. 

From the outset it was seen that everyone had plenty 

of "pep," and everyone predicted a successful season. The 

weather was SO bad toward the end of February that the s<|uad missed much-needed practice. 

However, the curtain was finally lifted against the strong " 'Bama" team at Tuscaloosa. We 

lost the series, but gained a lot of needed information as to who was who. 

Having whipped the team into fairly good shape, and the weather having warmed up a 
bit, Coach Fope carried his Bulldogs over to Jacksonville to do battle with the N'ormalites. The 
team made a clean sweep of the *erie* by big scores. 

The Marion Cadets, having tied Howard in football, came to town to have some more 
fun at our expense. But what did coach do but put "Ham" Stevens, of Marion fame, into the 
box? Hence, it was a one, two, three affair and the Cadets were sent back to Marion a sadder 
but wiser crew. In the entire serie- the Bulldogs hit 'em hard and clean. 

The following week the team from Union University came down to add more laurels to their 
crown. But in the opening game they were humbled to the dust by the mighty "Ham," who 
allowed them only one little scratch hit, which was due to the slow throw from third. It w.i* 
one of the greatest exhibitions of pitching ever seen on Berry Field. 

With the I'nion series over, an inspection of the calendar shows that we were due to face 
the crack aggregation of the soldier* at Fort Benning. Everyone took a long breath and won- 
dered what would be the outcome. The soldiers had humbled such teams as Auburn, Georgia, 
and the mighty Vandy. Led by the mighty "Hi" Davis, they were prepared to vent their 
spleen upon the Bulldogs. But the Bulldog had hi* bristles raised and the first battle resulted in 
a tie. Having made the acquaintance of the field and style of their opponents, the Bulldogs 
came back the second da\ with blood in their eves. Led by "Babe Ruth" Barfield and Fred 
White, the Bulldogs gathered in a total of fourteen hits. Barfield got two doubles the first two 
times up. White secured five, hits out of five tries. Score, 6-3 in favor of the Bulldog*. 

All during the season the team had worked and trained for one definite purpose — Get 
Southern! On the first day of Max the fight was on for the city championship. Stevens faced 
Hodge in the first game of the series. It was a fighting team that faced Southern that day, and, 
led by the heavj hitting of Barfield and the pitching of "Ham", we cleaned them out to the 
tune of 7-2. Errors showed iu*t how anxious the Bulldogs were because errors were responsible 
for the two runs made by Southern. Everybody was happy, and the team was anxious to make 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Txventy-four 



■^*%i 








HIHIIIIHim § 







■ 



OH 



it four straights for the series. The second game was almost a repetition of the first, except 
that "Ham" pitched a better game. Southern scored four runs, but the Bulldog clan made 
seven errors behind him. The hitting of Barfield was again the feature of the game. 

Now what might one sa> about the wonderful third game? Whoever saw that game saw 
twelve innings of real baseball. "Babe" (iraham and "Ham" Stevens needed on a baseball field. 
Hits were as scarce as traffic cops in Borneo. The fielding of both teams was as nearly perfect 
as baseball ever allows it to be. But the daj was long and someone had to win. In the twelve 
innings "Ham" began to weaken and Southern was enabled to win the victory. 

Then came that fourth game out at Munger Bowl. "Ham" was back on the mound and 
every man on the team was determined that that should be the last of the series. Who does not 
remember how Jess busted the first pitched ball on the nose for a single? Howard was right 
and it is a hard matter to defeat a team when it is right. Toby Stubbs, "Boiler" Alford, Jess 
and "Bo" Brindlev hit like demons and Southern was doomed. 

Of course, we could tell where Southern rallied in the ninth and in that wonderful running 
catch made by "Bob," but what iv the use? We won and we smothered the old Southern gang 
again, and that is about all the JO) any Howard man wants in this life. 

It was a good team that represented Howard; it was led by one of the cleanest fighting set 
coaches in Dixie, and we shall ever look back with pride to their record. 

Record of Games 

Howard ... 3; Standard Oil ... 5 Howard . . .14; Marion 8 

Howard . . . 9; Woodlawn .... 2 Howard . . 9; Union o 

Howard . 6; Central o Howard ... 4; Union 8 

Howard . . . o; Alabama 14 Howard ... 7; Southern 2 

Howard ... 3; Alabama 11 Howard ... 7; Southern 4 

Howard . . . Ii; Walker County . . 1 How. ml ... 4; Southern 1 

Howard ... 5; Jacksonville . . . . o Howard . . . 2; Southern 6 

Howard . . .19; Jacksonville .... 3 Howard ... 5; Southern 3 

Howard . . . 6; Marion 1 — — 

I'oial . . .117; Total Sj 

101 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



tmTT " TT1 " iiiin ninmilllnliii 1 1 .t, . u ,, . , | ,, ^i,,,, , , , , , | y m mnasa _ 




B 



erry 



Field 



One of the most notable instances of one's loyalty to one's Alma Mater that 
we have ever heard of anywhere is the recent gift of the athletic field, made by Col. 
W. A. Berry, one of Howard's prominent alumni. For years Howard has needed 
just such an athletic field and now we have one — one that we can justly be proud of. 
This new athletic field not only gives the coaches better opportunity in their work- 
out with the teams, but it gives us a chance to see our teams in action right here 
on our campus. 

In an effort to show, in a measure, our appreciation for what Colonel Berry has 
done, the student body presented him, on the night of the annual pep meeting, a 
loving cup, and we were so proud of our new field that we have erected over the en- 
trance a handsome arch in honor of Colonel Berry. 

How proud we are of our distinguished alumnus and of Berry Field ! 



mitt 



wmmmmmmmmm 



Jill! 



MM 










m 



^^ 



§~S 



: » 



E==^£C 



^ 



??=- 




P^ 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



% m i imi ii m ii i 



i"1" >m imllnlllHlnminim 




CTlll" milium I 




■■m 1 



Student Body Officers 



George W. Yarbrough 

President 

Virginia Minter 

Secretary 

C. E. Petty 
Treasurer 



Roswell Owens 

Vice-President 



Student Government 

The scholastic year of 1923-24 has been the most progressive year in the history ol 
student government at Howard. It has been the purpose of both faculty and student 
body to co-operate in such a way as to mutually relieve each other of certain burden- 
some tasks. Things never before attempted have been successfully undertaken. A 
new sense of responsibility on the part of the student is being seen and felt. A liner 
spirit of co-operation is being manifested along lines pertaining to college life in gen- 
eral. It is the purpose of those in charge to create a true spirit of democracy on the 
part of the student that he, or she, may be fitted for the full responsibilities of living 
as a citizen in a democracy. Much has been accomplished already, but more remains 
to be done. Let's set our hands firmly to the task and continue to go forward. 



105 



' r^ 






~*M ^4 - «a autre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



«@ WWW 


!@<i@3Q# 



Student Executive Council 

(. )fficers 

(;for(.i \V. Varbrough President 

Roswell Owens Vice-President 

Virginia Minter Secretary 

C. E. Petty Treasurer 

Student Council 

Senior Class Junior Class Sophomore Class 

Ethel Clark George Saxon Jep Denoy 

Ranzy Buckker Thelma Stact Thelma B\ii~ 

Freshman Class 
J. D. Kersey 
Admi ii Mati ison 

Work of Student Executive Council 

In compliance with the constitution of the student hotly, each class elects two <>t 
its members to serve on the student council. These members usually represent the 
more mature and conservative members of the respective classes. This council is the 
controlling factor in student government at Howard. Thej see to it that the honor 
system is carried out, that all other regulations are enforced, and check and audit all 
records and reports of student managers. The council of [923-24 has been a good 
one. They have been diligent and watchful. They have been progressive in spirit, 
yet conservative in action. The successful year enjoyed in all student affairs has been 
partially due to their efforts. 



106 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

g ii mii iii mMii i i""""""""'"" " Mii iiiii i ii i i m i in iii Nii ii M ii i i MMM i ""'"» 












■ 



Woman s Student Government 

Officers 

Eleanor Chandler President 

Julia Finklea Secretary and Treasurer 

Loyce Hevdrix Crumpton Hall President 

Gertrude York Ratliff Hall President 

Ethel Clark Senior Representative 

Mahle Willoughby Junior Representative 

Grace Pass Sophomore Representative 

Virginia Wall Freshman Representative 

Although the dormitory girls have just been organized under stu- 
dent government for a few months, it lias proved an excellent plan. 

Howard student body, as a whole, is run by student government and so 
the girls decided that, by their organization, all ends of the government 
would be upheld. It is an ideal plan for running the "ranch" and the 
year's results of discipline far exceed any of previous years. 



107 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

^g mDmmny| iiii i .. . ., „ |1 | ) i i Mmn i mi u i in ii m i i i imi ii Tm i i ii i ii i mw i mwi iii nOT i iiiiiiiii ii iii i f 




Willie Hugh Kirk 

Editor-in-Chief 



Fred White 

Business Manager 




108 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




"■^^r m ' 








E.8. JACKSON 
ASST. ADV. MSR. 



TURNER JORDAN GEORGE NEELY 

EDITOR ASST. EDITOR 



mm nous 




HARWELL ALLEN 
ASST. BUSINESS MGR. 



SWF 




ELIZABETH FOSTER 
LITERARY EDITOR 



GEORGE YARBOROUGH JAMES WISE 
ATH. ED- ADV. MGR. JUNIOR ED- ORG. ED. 



109 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



^r mrmmrnil HI" J i yiMIMIIIIIMI iii||iliiilllllllllll Illlimill IIIIIIIHII |IIIIIIIIIII rrwrnm rr. J, 




Turner Jordan 

Editor-in-Chief 



Paul Barnett 

Business Manager 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



I 1|i"| minimi iiimmiiiiiiiMiiiinillllllinil' 



mnniiiniiimTTTT 





E.E ALLEN 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 




J.L. CAMPBELL 
CIRCULATION MGR. 




E.G. JACKSON 
CIRCULATION MGR. 







JEWEL GRAVES 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



KNOX SPEARMAN 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



CRIMSON 
SWF 




W V 



FRANCIS M'-NEIL 
EXCHANGE EDITOR 




HE. WATLINGTON 
ALUMNI EDITOR 





JULIA FINKLEA 
SORORITY EDITOR 





C.E. PETTY 
ASST. BUSINESS MGR. 




S. G. KNOWLES 
CIRCULATION MGR. 




FRED WHITE 




HUGH AWTREY 
ATHLETIC 




ELIZABETH STEPHENSON J.C LEE 

HUMOR HUMOR 



HUGH BARFIELD 
FRATERNITIES 



RAMSEY BUCKNER 
MINISTERIAL tDITOR 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



MISS HOST 
says that poems of 
BURNS 

are in 

THE LIBRARY. 

DR. IVES 

says a plant's growth 

IS ARRESTED 

when anything results 

IN KILLING 

the plant. His 

CASE 



DR. CHAPMAN 
says that 
VAMPS 

are a menace to modest 
GIRLS. 



PROF. BURNS 



HOLDS UP 



to ridicule any 



MAN 



who says Bacon wrote 



is considered proved. Shakespeare's plays. 



THE GLEE CLUB 
of Howard is 
SENT 
TO 

SING 

at the community 

SING. 



DR. OPPITZ 

feeds chocolate 

DROPS 

to 

THE 

BABY. 



MISS HAYNES 
LOVES 

her trirls at Crumpton. 

A MAN 

's a man 

FOR 

A' THAT. 



PROF.de LAUNAY 



BURSTS 



forth every now and then 



the 



PIPE 



organ. 



DR. DAWSON 
has a furnace which 
1 \PLODED. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




"3 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



rimiiiiinimiHii iiiiiin mi' hi up t nun 




ii 4 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



£ l l l ii'iimiiii' iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnniii ii iiiilll l ll l ll J II MIli l l l l l l l ll I iiiimu i i """ "^ 





k) ^ 

X 

- '(]yf The Howard Players 

* The name "Howard Players" was adopted 

by the Dramatic Club when it was organized 
in the year '20-'21 under the able leadership 
of Miss A. Bess Clark, assistant English teacher that year. She chose as a starting 
point a group of students in English III as an expression class, and with these as a 
nucleus she built a strong and active club. The aim of the club is threefold ; namely, 
the development of the dramatic talent of the students; the development of apprecia- 
tion of better drama, and a promulgation of interest in Howard throughout the state. 
Each year the Howard Players put on a very successful program at the Jefferson 
Theater, and in this way it serves to advertise the college as well as prove beneficial 
to the participants. 

Officers 

Ethel Clark President 

Loyce Hendrix Vice-President 

Evelyn Graves Secretary 

Virginia Hill Treasurer 

Jep Dendy Stage Manager 

Members 
Ethel Clark Orlando Ogle 

Jep Dendy Elizabeth Graves 

Johnnie Lee Poole Gertrude York 

Iva Pearl Ray Florence Hagood 

Glenn O. Gibbs J. Jones Stewart 

Evelyn Graves Mayme Thompson 

Loyce Hendrix Miriam THORNTON 

Virginia Hill Roberta Trecksel 

James Jarrei.l Hulan Whitehead 

Willie Hugh Kirk Mabel Wii.i.oigiiby 

James H. Wise 



>'5 



J3jgp7?^V 





<3 



^ 



^ 



BOYS GLEE CLUB 



Il6 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




tflDIC 

ttUSIC WA5HE3 HUM fftOtt THE 
SOUL THE DU5T OP EVERYDHy LIFE 




Boys Glee Club 

B. F. Atkins, Director 

Officers 

H. E. WATLINGTON, Jr President 

George Freeman Secretary 

Frank Mullins Manager 

Douglas M. Braswell Accompanist 

Members 

E. E. Allen Carl Hearn 
D. M. Braswell H. E. Dickinson James Jarrell 

D. P. BULLINGTON A. H. EUBANK TOM KJELLY 

A. S. Bragan J. T. Ellis John Lancley 

Lacy Cowart John Finklea F. A. Mullins 

John Cooke W. S. Fuller Aubrey Miree 

John Chapelle A. L. Head C. G. Manasco 

F. E. White Rex Sullivan H. E. Watlington 

The Glee Club in Concert at 
Birmingham Florence 

Fairfield Decatur 

Jasper Russellville 

Haley ville Cullman 

Besides the various songs by the club, the program is featured by man) other 
numbers. The main features arc the varsity and scrap-iron quartettes. Messrs. 1 learn 
and Braswell entertain with a piano duet. In forms ot syncopation, the sa\o 
phone trio and the jazz orchestra are outstanding numbers. The Glee Club is quite 
successful this year. 



>«7 










Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 




IIIMIIIIIIHIIIT l IIINII| | | | , | p>,| 




Howard Band 

The Howard band was organized in September, 1923, under the able director- 
ship of Professor Fred G. Wiegand. Although the first time such an enterprise has 
been undertaken here, it has proven a tremendous accomplishment. At first onlj 
about fifteen members could be mustered and success seemed impossible, but by No- 
vember there were over thirty enrolled, and on the day of the Birmingham-Southern- 
Howard game forty-four uniformed "Sousarites" gave spirit to the fracas. From that 
number thirty earned their letters. 

We are firmly founded now and our greatest desire is that the sound which rang 
out that September morning may be perpetually relayed throughout all the sessions 
which are to follow and so establish our present bright hope into a magnificent tradition. 



1 iS 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



I umtyjsi 



T i n i i. ii ii iii i iiiiiiiii " i n i i iiiiiM i muu^ i iiiiM i ii iii ii ii i ii iniu ii i i ii i iM i iunMiiriiiimi^ iBg^ ^-Tnnii i iiiH i n i ii i iii i i illlll l t 




119 




p |hhiiitu'^iitPttiih 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

Hflf mmm i mii i ii im j ' j | i |i i i i ii ii iii n i Lumimmi^ i| gm ■ 



The Divinity Club 



p-gr rrrti I I ' best part "• ministerial education at Howard is not theological, but personal, prac- 
ri\M ff*\ 'i'' 1 ' •""' sni 'al. Young preachers go li> Howard as crude as unrefined Texas petro- 
:'■', J i/z4 lciiin, the\ leave as policed as new benzine; they enter Howard as theoretical and 
unsubstantial as a petrified dream, the) go away with some definite knowledge and 
experience in Christian service; they enroll in the college as timid and unsocial as the rabbits 
I >< ^i it>> found around Tuscaloosa, they graduate fairly well prepared to face a life of social 
relations. That is all just a round-about way of saying that ministerial students at Howard 
net training and experience which is absolutely indispensable to Success as churchmen and 
Christian workers, although that knowledge and experience is not primarily theological. 

More specifically it is interesting to note that there are forty-six ministerial students at 
Howard this year, twenty-two of whom have lull-time or part-time churches, preaching sixty- 
four sermons in thirty-seven different churches every month, reaching approximately six thou- 
sand souls with the gospel message. Last summer about one hundred and fifty people were 
baptized bj Howard students. Other students do much pulpit supply work and general reli- 
gious service in the churches and Sunday schools of Birmingham. The preachers are a bus\ 
tribe, an energetic set — splendid band. 

"Here's to the preacher, 
The upward readier ; 
The man who lifts — 
Gives God his gifts — 
Here's to the preacher." 



T. E. SWEARINGEN 
E. L. BUCKNER 

I.. \V. Weavi r 



H. S. HinnoN 
D. W. Bt Kso\ 

V. I.. Wyai i 



\v. A. Conner 
R. L. Gardner 

B. C. COKER 



J. A. Timmerm \n 
W. O. WOOLEI 

Jos. Avnn 

I) u id C. Pi. ess 

Wl WER 

J. I. Salter 



Members 

Class of kjjj 
II. c Ketchum 

( .. ( .. W'ii i i wis 

ROSW III ((WINS 

Class of 1925 

1. I. Edwards 
B. F. Atkins 

R. I.. BONN] K 

R. L. Evans 
Class of 1926 



II. E. Dickinson* 
J. E. Franks 

Class of 1927 
M. X. Steadham 

R. C. F.ASOV 

Jesse Llcas 

III SKY Rogers 

(). M Fox 
Wilson 

Nichols 



J. L. Wharton 
A. N. Willis 
Hobart Amos 



L. G. Johnston 
A. S. Waters 
W. T. Minis 



R. L. Alex vnder 

J. 0. JOHNSTON 
j. I). Wl Ml 



J. A. Hays 

C. D. Rhodes 
F. C. Perdue 
II. M. Thomas 
B. F. Dykes 
W. A. Wiggins 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



y i rTrnmimrmmiiiiill lM III M I III I iiiilllllll i n i » i iiii m i m i ^ ii uh ii| i ""■ 

&/l'ttll'l \ >l 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

l ^nj; iii. - i m i.lll, 1 || ;jii ; i»ii;.]Mi^iijiM l J ip ii TTi ni im a m * m 







Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 








Rutki 



lans 



Colors: Blue and Gold 



Flower: Rose 



Watchword: "Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee a crown of life" 

I will be true, for there are those who trust me; 

I will be pure, for there are those who care ; 
I will be strong, for there are those who suffer; 

I will be brave, for there is much to dare; 
1 will be friend to all the foe, the friendless; 

I will be giving and forget the gift; 
I will be humble, for 1 know my weakness; 

1 will look up, and love, and laugh, and lift. 



Officers 

Beatrice Caver President 

Gladys Wyatt Vice-President 

Inez Gardner Secretary 

Mamie Chamblee Treasurer 



Gussie Upchurch 
Carlene Wyatt 



Charter Members 
Eva Burson 
Beatrice Caver 
Mildred McDowell 



Clara DeShayo 
Dee Sapp 



Members 



Beatrice Caver 
Kathleen McDowell 
Mildred Murray 
Inez Gardner 
Ethel Cureton 
Irene Brigcs 
Nell McMurkay 
I. aura Adams 



Vera Scott 
Ainna Railiff 
Gladys Wyatt 
Verlinda Clark 
Ella Thomas 
Gussie rpciiuRcn 
Gertrude Tidwell 
Mamie Chamblee 



Mrs. V. L. Wyatt 



Honorary Members 

Mary Emma McFhail 



Mrs. R. I). Wriciii 



•23 






~""v 



,-Jy; 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiuenty-four 



■ M»n.nnn.iriii 






*> 








12+ 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

£ jm^m iiimimi i iii i i i i ii iiimm i m iii i i nTTimmTCTnfflii iiiiiii imiMim i N'mji , nmnni m u^ 








Officers 

Willie Kirk President 

Gertrude York Vice-President 

Mary Bunn Gay Secretary 

Bill Hardy Treasurer 

Undergraduate Representative 
Aileen Gullahorne 



Cabinet 



Miriam Thornton 
Evely Graves 
Thelma Bates 



Lola Moody 
Nannie B. Chandler 
Ethel Clark 



Helen Hurlbert 

On January 19, 1922, the co-eds of Howard College organized a student Y. W. 
C. A. with practically all the girls in school as members. The organization was per- 
fected by Miss French Haynes, assistant professor of English, who was a leader in 
the Y. W. C. A. at Meredith College. 

The purpose of the Y. W. C. A. is to bring the co-eds closer together and to lead 
them through faith to Jesus Christ. 

Aileen Gullahorne has charge of the Freshman commission, in which a large group 
of girls are being trained for future cabinet members. 

The work of the publicity committee has been very effective under the expert 
hand of Lola Moody, assisted by {Catherine Wilking. 

The Y. W. C. A. is by far the largest organization on the campus and great 
credit is due it for making Howard College keep on the map. Two representatives 
represented the organization at Blue Ridge last summer. 



125 




I Bunnnim 



\iui>^'-/* " ' 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



Z^'" ■ ' '"imn prnmnniiirnpiiimirn in; 




126 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



r ' fisiiX 



£ 111111,11111 llir i l l i inM l l ll inn i ll ll lUMlll li n i l ll lL I II I LI I F I I I lll ll l l T l l l Mlll^i' ' 1 ''"'''''''''' 1 "" " "I""" ' 1 1 l iHIII 1 1 n i JXU^ l>g ^- T jjaJ g g ^^T-r-rT-rri i 1 1 1 Ul lllTTTTTTTTTTTTTrmTTT-rW 




Officers 

Jep Dendy President 

R. L. Alexander Vice-President 

Perry L. Stone Secretary 

Roswell Owens Treasurer 

J. H. Wise Reporter 



Paul Barnett 

D. W. Burson 

E. L. BUCKNER 

J. S. Brindley 
E. L. Crew 
R. L. Alexander 
Jep Dendy 



Members 

George Saxon 
Perry L. Stone 
Fred Carter 

C. T. IVEY 

J. Jones Stewart 
J. L. Wharton 



C. W. Gross 
A. S. Waters 
Orlando Ogle 
George W. Yarbrough 
Roswell Owens 
E. R. Dawson 
J. H. Wise 



The Y. M. C. A. at Howard is at present a very active organization. It remained 
in a dormant period for almost four months on account of lack of co-operation and 
lack of purpose, hut a rejuvenation was enacted, and in the early part of the new- 
years, with a re-election it began to be very active. 

The purpose of the new Y. M. C. A. is to be the main stepping stone and the 
middle stile of all the religious and social organizations on the campus, maintaining 
a standardization which will fulfill the real needs of such a campus as Howard 
has. The "Y" intends to take charge of everything important, both materially and 
morally, that will carry our institution to the ranks of the highest. 

The membership this year is select. The charter members were selected, and it 
is their purpose to keep the non-workers and the non-co-operatives out of this live 
organization. Instead ot making it an association of everybody, with nobody doing 
any good, the group of organizers figured and decided it best to make it a select 
honor to belong to it. As a result, the "Y" is alive and its organization ami work 
can be felt and is rapidly becoming an important factor on our campus. 



127 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-fou) 



"""" """ '"mi uui ' nmm g 




128 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




ift^ 




Student Mi 



ission 



Band 



JsHjSpjJJHE challenge has come: "Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel 
iptjs^J to every creature." Many have heard and heeded the command and have 
gflU g^ sacrificed their lives gloriously and unselfishly in the service of the Re- 
deemer. Many more are giving their youth in painstaking preparation for an even 
greater service. One of the most conscientious, hard-working mission bands any- 
where is the group of happy, joyful, young Christians at Howard who have volun- 
teered their all in the service of the Master. Daily they are trying to so live that 
others may see their good works and glorify our Father. 



Officers 

R. L. Alexander President 

Ainna Ratliffe Vice-President 

Catharine Siniard Secretary 

H. S. Higdon Treasurer 

Ella Thomas Reporter 



Perry Stone 
Inez Gardner 
Mary Robinson 
Lottie Handlev 
O. M. Fox 
Ainna Ratliff 
Ella Thomas 
Ethel Gregg 
Grace McGaughey 
Kathleen McDowell 
Ethel Cureton 



Members 

Paul Oden 
J. A. Hayes 
W. A. Wiggins 
B. F. Dykes 
H. M. Thomas 
Vera Scott 

A. C. Adams 

B. C. Coker 
Nell McMurray 
W. A. Conner 

H. S. HlCDEN 

J. I. Edwards 
Gussie Upchurch 
Mary Emma McPhaii. 
H. C. Rogers 
E. L. Epley 
R. L. Alexander 
R. L. Evans 
H. G. Ketciium 

W. O. WOLLEY 



J. P. Lucas 

J. A. Timmerm an 

Ransy Buckner 

D. W. Burson 
Beatrice Caver 

E. A. Mims 

T. E. SWEARINGEN 

V. L. Wyatt 

Catherine Siniard 
Alton Murphy 
Mildred Murray 



129 




u 






m gfui[ii\}\]jun 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 





130 



7'. 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



EKlf> 




Square and Compass 




SIN the year 1717 the first grand lodge of symbolic Masonry was organized 
|Xfl and just two hundred years later, under the laws of Virginia, the national 
i^LicSsj fraternity of Square and Compass was organized. The Square and Com- 
pass is an intercollegiate organization of men who are Masons. The fraternity was 
organized for the purpose of furthering Masonry and that for which it exists among 
college men who are Masons. Here we resolve ourselves together to help humanit) 
and uphold the principle of brotherly love and co-operation, and especially do we 
wish to help the college to carry forth the lighted lamp of learning into the darkened 
corners of error and ignorance. 

The different chapters of the fraternity are known as squares. The Howard 
square was organized February 11, 1921, with the following men as charter members: 
H. L. Nipper, J. J. Bell, W. T. Edwards, A. M. Glover, V. B. Ross, V. M. Gardner, 
B. Lawrence, \V. M. Kelly, R. B. Sims. The chapter has continued to grow from 
the start and it is only a matter of time until they will have a house on the campus. 

At present they are laboring under a very great handicap by having to use the 
Franklin Literary Society Hall as a meeting place. 

There are several men on the campus who are being made Masons. 



Officers 

D. W. Rurson President 

I,. W. YVe.wfr Vice-President 

R. E. Owens Secretary 

B. F. Atkins Corresponding Secretary 

V. I.. WYATT Treasurer 

J. D, WYATT Chaplain 

W. A. Wiggins Tyler 

J. E. Bains Reporter 

E. I.. BUCKNER Historian 



R. L. Alexander 

J. I.. Wharton 
I). W. Rurson 



Members 

R. F. Atkins 
V r . L. Wyatt 
J. E. Rains 
Dayton Riddle 
R. E. Evans 



I.. W. Weaver 
W. A. Wiggins 
E. L. Buckner 



131 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



"" jiMirn mm i TTTrm il l l l l l l llllll ll lini "'" i i inn p g, g 



Literary Societies 




EMBERS ot tin- Philomathic Literary Society feel a certain amount of pride 
in the fact that theirs is the oldest organization of its kind in the state. 
There is also a deep sense of pride in the traditions of this society. It 
hoasts of the largest membership on the campus. The work of the present year has 
been unusually successful. Its members, as never before, are displaying great in- 
terest in the organization. 

There is another society for men on our campus — the Franklin. They, too, boast 
of an eventful past. The sixty-seventh year of their history is past and they are 
proud that the record they have made this year will add many things to the glories 
of former years. The membership is not as large as that of the other societies, yet 
they feel that in quality there is strength. 

There is a splendid spirit of rivalry existing between these two men's societies. 
For years there has been a debate between these societies and as usual the feeling is 
running high as the time approaches for the annual clash. 

The Shelburne is the older of the two literary societies for women. Formerly its 
membership consisted of the entire co-ed student body. They have had a very suc- 
cessful year to crown their other brilliant years of the past. 

The number of co-eds has increased steadily from year to year, and the increase 
this year was so great that it was deemed wise to organize a second literary society 
for young women. The result has been the organization of the Pulliam Literary So- 
ciety — an organization which bids fair to run a swift race for first place in the ranks 
of the literary societies. 

The purpose of these societies is to offer to its membership an opportunity to what- 
ever talent he may have to cultivate. Two semester hours credit is given for regular 
attendance upon one of the literary societies and such attendance is required of all 
candidates for degrees. 



132 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



f, (nun mini mm 



'■' ' '" m ili um^ 




The Ensley-Howard Club 

The Ensley-Howard Club consists of all the students who are grad- 
uates of Ensley High School. Its members are very active and they 
arrange many plans which cause prospective students from Ensley to 
become interested in Howard. Boost Howard. Welcome new stu- 
dents. That's the spirit. 

Officers 

Hllan Whitehead President 

Elizabeth Foster Vice-President 

Mattie Lois Albert Secretary 



The Central-Howard Club 

The Central-Howard Club was organized in the fall of 1921 for 
the purpose of encouraging students from Central High School to attend 
Howard. Its membership includes all students who are graduates from 
Central. They are working with all their might to strengthen the bonds 
which exist between the two schools. 

Officers 

Carlton Lee President 

Roberta Trechsel rice-President 

Ruth Wallace Secretary 

Hazel Cobb Reporter 



'33 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



tZj^twuiwmminiziiimnnusiummnmmi UlUUllUlum 



mumimniiimifn m 




Demonstration School 



The Howard Demonstration School, in the third year of its organization, has 
been giving second and third, sixth and seventh semester work to about thirty high 
school students. This has furnished practice teaching facilities for Seniors majoring 
in education. 

STL'DIiXTS ix De.moxstratiox 



Bennett, Allie Grace 
Bohannon, Oka Frances 
Burton, Edith Lloyd 



Semester Vl-Vll 
Bush, Mrs. Bennie Lea, Nancy 
Cleckler, Sunset Lott, Laura 
Harper, Opal Stacy, Maude 



Si \nlev, LORAINE 

Stevens. Clarence 



Bolon, Samuel 
Brock, Jack 
Brock, Wilson- 
Cobb, Suzie 



Semester 1I-III 
Forte nberry, George IIolcomb, Elizabeth Perry, Alice 



Frost, Douglas 
HAWLEY, Edwin 



Manasco, Charles 
Neelev, Hazel 



roddenbery, guesneey 

Tait, Lester 
Wrbnn, 1'hh.ma 



Extension School 



The Extension School is conducted by the Department of Education for the 
benefit of teachers in the schools of the Birmingham district who wish to advance 
toward a college degree by Saturday work during the winter and by summer school 
attendance during the vacations. This winter the Saturday registration has reached 
eighty-five persons. The courses are taught by members of the regular Howard 
faculty, and laboratory instructors are provided in the scientific studies. 

Virginia CARSWELL, Supervisor 



Instructors 



Erskine Braswell 
J i \nette Vaughn- 
Miriam Thornton 
Nellie Gibbs 
Lovce Hendrix 



Roberta Trecksel 
Ailf.es Gui.lahorn 
Gertrude York 
Ethel Clark 



James Jarrell 
Frank Norris 
J. B. Lamberth 
Ruth Wallace 



J. M. Vanderford 
Virginia Hill 
Ei.i.v May Lawley 
Hugh Barfield 
Annie Lou Burns 



i34 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 





Dining Hall Council 



Mrs. M. L. Harris Dietitian 

George \V. Yarbrough President 

J. S. Brindley Manager 



J. B. Lamberth 
Frank Mullins 
George Saxon 



J. S. IlOI.BROOK 

Hugh Barfield 

E. L. BUCKNER 



Co-operative "Dining" 

Among the most cherished traditions of Howard is the co-operative student man- 
agement of the dining hall at Renfroe, where all the campus residents take their meals. 
It is operated entirely without faculty supervision by men who eat there, under the 
general guidance of .Mrs. Harris, dietitian. More and better food at lower cost is 
the boast of every Renfroe roomer. Hoard hills are paid monthly in advance, and 
at the end of the year anj sum that is left over is divided proportionately among those 
who have met their monthly bills. The Dining Council is composed of one repre- 
sentative from each of the tour fraternities, the Divinity Club, and the non-frats, 
and these men are elected by their respective groups. The manager is elected annually 
by the council, in whose power lies the employment of waiters and dining hall regu- 
lations. 



>35 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIII HUH ' luillllllllll lliii M i u rr 




Debating Council 

Officers 



D. \V. Burson . . . 
Clyde Warren 



. President 
Secretary 



Pliilnmathic — 
George Neeley 
J. L. Wharton 
Clyde Warren 



Representatives 
Franklin — 
Frank Atkins 
V. L. Wyatt 

Honorary — 
D. W. Burson 
George Saxon 
Paul Barnett 
A. Nelson Willis 



Shelburne — 

Mary Bunn Gay 
Virginia Minter 
Gertrude York 



136 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



■^^n 







Pi K 



appa lau 



Honor Society, Founded 1922 



fag jwJHIS is a society, the purposes of which are to emphasize the importance of 
'-f^JisjJ the highest proficiency in student scholarship, and to stimulate individual 
'.'■21 c-^ ambition by making membership in it the reward for notable excellence in 
studies and for notable service to the college. Members are elected from the faculty, 
the graduates and undergraduates of the college. Undergraduates are elected from 
those members of the Senior Class who have maintained a grade of A in a majority 
of their courses for the whole period of their stay in college. Faculty members and 
alumni and alumnae are elected on the ground of notable scholarship, the achieve- 
ment of honors for themselves in college, or the rendering of noteworthy material 
service to the college. The following is a list of the charter members of this society: 



Charter Members 

John C. Dawson Annie Boyett 

P. P. Burns John E. Brewton 

Ruth Morris E. E. Cox 

Bennie Spinks Gladys Falkner 

J. A. Hendricks J. P. Hall 

James B. Trant Eunice Sloan 

Elected 1922 

A. D. Smith Carey P. McCord 



Elected 1923 



James Brittain 
Robert Herring 
Mildred Smith 
J. A. Ward 
C. C. Crossland 
L. E. Thomas 



Carl Vaughn 
Hallie Stevenson 

Ravner Tillman 
YV. A. Berry 
F. (J. Caiih 
F. P. Hocam 



J. C. Sttvender 



'37 




C"^ 



I 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




•rr-f 




ias&&ia£?wm&»lB*vnrwtm 



Scientific Society 



Officers 

Dr. Ions K. Oppitz President 

Ethel Clark Secretary 



Dr. Saunders 



Program Committee 

Dr. Ives 
Dr. Oppitz 
C. D. Riddle 



Mildred Murray 



R. K. LlNDOP 

R. W. Stallworth 

I. (i. Riddle 



Memkers 
Ho Brindley 

( rl ORGE ECONOMI 5S 

Roberta Trechal 



Hii.lv Britton 
Jones Stewart 
R. A. Murchison 



Frank I.assiter 
(Jvokgi Saxon 
Clarence Thomas 



( rLEKN GlBBS 

Paul Austin 

Julian Keller 



I km a Parsons 
I \i' Hendri.v 
George Neeley 
Gene YVatlington 



138 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



C p rnmtmm 



iiilMlliiiiiimll|||||llllllll 




n i ii i i iiii m ii i i n ii i T i njjjma 



College Sunday School Class 




HE Howard College Sunday School Class continues to run successfully 
in its old meeting place in Montague Hall. It bears the name of "B" 
and truly it comes up to its name. Dr. W. A. Barrett is their eloquent, 
intellectual, and influential teacher. He is one of the most efficient Sunday school 
workers of the state. It is a blessing and an inspiration to the college students to be 
thrown in contact with such a man. 

The class has a large membership this year and is flourishing under an efficient 
corps of officers. The officers are as follows: 



J. S. Brindlev President 

Ruby Burns Vice-President 

L. E. Carrol Secretary 

E. L. Darden Treasurer 

Cora Blanche Morris Pianist 



College B. Y. P. U. 



The college B. Y. P. U. is one of Howard's liveliest organizations. Its member- 
ship increased so much this year that it was necessary to divide it into two contesting 
unions. They are the "I XL" and the "JOY." Both of the divisions are led by 
excellent and efficient officers. As a whole, the union lives up to the standard as a 
Baptist Young People's Union. Each division of the union is made up of four 
groups. The group leaders are all very competent and each Sunday evening inspira- 
tional programs are carried out. The P. Y. P. U. means a lot to Howard, and as 
an organization we recommend it as one of the best. They emphasize the training 
of young people and the members boost their union. Let's go, P. Y. 1'. I . We 
are for you. 



'.?9 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-jour 




We d "Give Up the Ghost" If 

1 here were any heat in the Main Building on cold days. 

Exams were abolished in Howard. 

Everybody attended the student body meetings. 

Sunday didn't come between Saturday and Monday. 

The boys didn't have their "bull-fight'' three times a day. 

Campus politics were a thing of the past. 

Fees came due except when we were "busted." 

Professor Burns were to give an easy Shakespeare exam. 

Dr. Scliemann wore a collar large enough. 

Dr. Hendrix should have his door unlocked after the five-minute bell. 

Dr. Dawson were to stand still while delivering an address in chapel. 

Dr. Chapman were to cross his legs. 

Professor de Launay failed to comment on the — 

Professor Eagles should find a hair restorer and use it "as far as I know." 

Mrs. Vandiver could get her rehearsals attended. 



« 40 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

^ ,,, „ ,, limn i mill, iiiM i i i iiH ii n i M iii iimmyjii i m i j ii i 'i i ■ inu i i i m i mmim mmggp 




FRATERrtttl&S 

^SORORITIES 



•41 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



W>^ 





7Xi 



143 



% 



, "N. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 





>44 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Ttuenty-four 



^=^.i' 





Pi Kappa Alpha 

Founded at the University of Virginia in 1868. Sixty-three Active Chapters 
Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Lily-of-the-Valley 

Founders 
F. S. Taylor Robertson Howard L. W. Tazwell J. E. Wood J. B. Sclates 

Fratres in Facultate 
R. W. Allen Alfred Moore 

Alpha Pi Chapter 

Established in 1911 

Fratres in Collegio 
Class of 1924. 

Daniel A. Gavlord Birmingham, Alabama 

A. L. Head Walnut Grove, Alabama 

F. A. Mullins Clanton, Alabama 

R. E. Owens Enterprise, Alabama 

R. A. Nunnally Birmingham, Alabama 

C. E. Hearn Wylam, Alabama 

Class of 1925 

J. L. Gregory Birmingham, Alabama 

H. E. Whitehead Ensley, Alabama 

H. E. Watlington, Jr Birmingham, Alabama 

W. M. McCarthy Birmingham, Alabama 

Paul W. Austin Ensley, Alabama 

A. C. Stephenson Birmingham, Alabama 

Ciias. Wier Ensley, Alabama 

Class of 1926 

C. H. Stevens El Paso, Texas 

R. H. Tinki.epaugh Birmingham, Alabama 

E. R. Dawson Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

R. A. Clayton Birmingham, Alabama 

F. C. Freeman Birmingham, Alabama 

F. E. Williams Fairfield, Alabama 

A. H. Knight Birmingham, Alabama 

J. B. Parks t Brundidge, Alabama 

J. I.. Finki.ea Buena Vista, Alabama 

C. F. PETTY Cullman, Alabama 

Class of 192 j 

W. S. CA3EY Birmingham, Alabama 

D. M. WEBB Mobile, Alabama 

II. S. Tinki.epaugh Birmingham, Alabama 

J. D. KERNEY Morganfield, Kentucky 

I'. II. Ai.iord Birmingham, Alabama 

P. I,. PAINE Andalusia, Alabama 

I4S 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



in i i ii ii rrj||]jgj^""""""" iii i iii ni ii i iii i i ii i in iini i miii ii ii i nir n 



P. K 



appa 



A1 D K 



pna 



Roll of Chapti rs 



University ol Virginia 

I >a\ ill-nil College 

William and Mary College 

Birmingham-Southern College 

University of Tennessee 

Tulane University 

Southwestern Presbyterian University 

Hampden-Sidney Col lege 

Transy Ivania University 

Presbyterian College of South Carolina 

University ol Richmond 

Washington and Lee I niversity 

Vanderbilt University 

University of North Carolina 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Roanoke College 

North Georgia Agricultural College 

University ol Kentucky 

Trinity College 

Louisiana State University 

Georgia School of Technology 

North Carolina State Agricultural am 

chanical College 
University of Arkansas 
University of Florida 
University of West Virginia 

Millsaps College 

Missouri State School oi Mines 
Georgetown College 
University ol Missouri 
University ot Cincinnati 
Smithw estern University 



I M« 



Howard College 
Ohio State University 
University of California 
University of Utah 
New York University 
Iowa State University 
Syracuse University 
Rutgen College 

Kansas State Agricultural College 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Washington 
University of Kansas 
University of New Mexico 
Western Reserve University 
Southern Methodist University 
University of Illinois 
Cornell University 
Beloit College 
Emory University 
Washington University 
University of Texas 
Oregon Agricultural College 
University ol Wisconsin 
University of Oklahoma 
University of Pennsylvania 
Colorado College 
Carnegie Institute of Technology 
University of Michigan 
("niversity of Colorado 
Purdue University 
University of Minnesota 
Mercer University 



146 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

g ^ i mn <Tiiiiiiii TTTTiiiiiii»iiiiTTTin i miiuiiiTiniiTnn t n i u iuiiii a ui Ji n i iii nr i M i ii iiii*i |ii ["Tiiii^ijiiii^ 



rCXM 






gan^a*^B-'fc^ m ,> jS J 




'47 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



MMM ii ,n ii i i M iiiii m i iii i liiHM ii iniM iiii M l l i l ll Mi iiii ,niMr """"| || |n||| f Q 








0©@O 




148 



t ESS 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



Sigma Nu 



Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1869. Ninety Active Chapters 
Colors: Old Gold. Black, and White Flotoer: White Rose 



James F. Hopkins 



Founders 
John W. Hobson 



James M. Riley 



Iota Chapter oi Sigma Nu 

Established in 1879 

FRATRES IX COLLEGIO 

Class of 1924 

Erskine M. Braswell Demopolis, Alabama 

James Jarrell Lineville, Alabama 

J. Brolchton Lamberth Alexander City, Alabama 

J. Frank Norris East Lake, Alabama 

Charles D. Riddle East Lake, Alabama 

Class of 192 § 

E. Llrton" Blassingame Montgomery, Alabama 

E. Braxton Cosper Sterretts, Alabama 

J. Jones Stewart Mobile, Alabama 

William H. Stlbbs East Lake, Alabama 

James H. Wise LaFayette, Alabama 

Class of 1926 

Dolclas M. Braswell Demopolis, Alabama 

M. R. Blckalew, Jr Roanoke, Alabama 

Joseph Bancroft East Lake, Alabama 

John T. Ellis, Jr. Clanton, Alabama 

ERMAN L. Crew Goodwater, Alabama 

C. Thadoius Ivev Evergreen, Alabama 

Earl F. Tinclev Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of J 92 7 

Edwin M. Bandy Birmingham, Alabama 

WILLIAM X. BURCHFIELD East Lake, Alabama 

Asher S. Bracan Birmingham, Alabama 

LACT C<a\\ki Haleyville, Alabama 

ARTHUR S. Daniel Ea^t Lake, Alabama 

Alfred H. Eubank Ensley, Alabama 

Edwin J. Lamberth Mexander City, Alabama 

John II. LOLLAR Jasper, Alabama 

C. W. SMITH Alexander City, Alabama 

O. T. SMITH Goodwater, Alabama 

Y. L. Senn" Ea*t Lake. Alabama 

E. P. Wai.lis Selma, Alabama 



'49 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




iii J iiii i iii i iii u i m i m j inn;m i >mf ifTn jiiiniii ii infimimm « 



Sigma Nu 



Roll of Ch vpti rs 



I ni\ ersitj nt Virginia 

Bethanj ColU gi 

Mercer University 

University oi Alabama 

Howard College 

North Georgia Agricultural College 

Washington and Lee University 

Universitj oi Georgia 

Universit) of Kansas 

Emorj Universitj 

Lehigh University 

Universit} oi Missouri 

Vanderbilt University 

1 rniversity oi Texas 

Louisiana State University 

Universitj ol North Carolina 

DePauw University 

Perdue University 

Indiana University 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Mount Union College 

Southwest Kansas College 

University of Iowa 

Ohio State University 

William Jewel College 

University of Pennsylvania 

University oi Vermont 

North Carolina College of Agriculture am 

Mechanical Arts 
Rose Polytechnic Institute 
Tulane University 
I. eland Stanford College 
University of California 
Georgia School of Technology 
Northwestern University 
Albion College 

Steven's School of Technology 
Colgate University 
Maryland State College 
Trinity College 
I 1 1 aj ette College 
University of Oregon 
Colorado School of Mines 
Cornell University 
University of Kentucky 



Universitj oi Colorado 

University oi Wisconsin 

Universitj oi Illinois 

Universitj oi Michigan 

Missouri School of Mines 

Universitj oi Washington 

University of West Virginia 

University of Chicago 

Iowa State College 

Universitj oi Minnesota 

Universitj oi Arkansas 

Universitj oi Montana 

Syracuse University 

Case School of Applied Science 

Dartmouth College 

Columbia Universitj 

Penn State College 

University of Oklahoma 

Western Reserve Universitj 

University of Nebraska 

Lombard College 

State College of Washington 

Delaware College 

Brown University 

Stetson University 

University of Maine 

University of Nevada 

University of Idaho 

George Washington Universitj 

Colorado Agricultural College 

Carnegie Institute of Technology 

Oregon Agricultural College 

University of Arizona 

Drury College 

Wesleyan Universitj 

University of Wyoming 

Oklahoma Agricultural College 

University of Florida 

University of Tennessee 

University of the South 

William and Mary College 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

University of North Dakota 

University of Utah 



150 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Ttventy-four 



^Mfe 




^ Mm^imTiimiim iii imi i nnnn i mnmmnn i T i Hi i mnn i nmi muii^^ 




»5' 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

U|j Mi^Mim^ i ij™mm iiiinjUi]iiiiiJi M.iiiiiiiii|iiiiTN i "" 1 UIIMIW fl 






@9@@ 




152 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

I ti ii..] mm i nii i m ii iii ' """ i i iiiM i i i m ii iiimiii ii mmii i ii ii r t TTmmTTimTnm im 




Psi Delta Fraternity 

Founded at Howard College in 1900 



Colors: Purple and Gold 

Founders 
Mell Durant Smith William C. Crawford 

F. Hatcher Watkins Albert Lee Smith 

Frater in Faclltate 
Percy Pratt Burns 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1924 

Hugh H. Barfield Lineville, 

J. Carlton Lee Birmingham, 

J. Orlando Ogle Birmingham, 

Robert W. Shelton Birmingham, 

Fred H. White Birmingham, 

George W. Yarbrouch Lamar, 

Class of 1925 

Hugh H. Awtrey Steele, 

Frank B. Best, Jr Birmingham, 

William S. Fuller Dadeville, 

Class of 1926 

William R. Abbott Easonville, 

Alfred L. Bains, Jr Oneonta, 

Robert H. Bradford Uniontown, 

Robert J. Dendy Boaz, 

Horace S. Hall Birmingham, 

Edward G. Jackson Ashford, 

Aubrey S. Miree, Jr Birmingham, 

Rayburn L. Wear Ashburn 

J. Elliott Scarbrouch, Jr Mt. Willing, 

Roy L. Shelton Birmingham, 

Fred W. Streit Birmingham, 

W. Burton Dowell, Jr Birmingham, 

Class of 192-] 

Claude M. Brewster Hollywood, 



Flower: Violet 



Thomas V. Neal 



Lent S. Brewstir 
James F. Dii.lard, Jr 
George C. Freeman 
Mai. comb H. Hardy 
John M. Langley 
Ralph K. Lindop 
A. Hayden McDanal 
Clyde T. Warren 



. Hollywood, 
Birmingham, 
Birmingham, 
Birmingham, 
. Sylacauga, 

. . Si llll.l, 

. . . Sipsey, 
. Sylacauga, 



Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 

Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 

Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Georgia 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 

Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 

Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 
Alabama 



153 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



in f i iip™NiMi«i i iii ) i i ii iii iiiii iiiii | ii i ■ m nrr q 





.'0 







'54 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



i i||iii | iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi mi iinnmiiiiHHi i M iii i i t iii i i i i i i ii iiiiii ini i mwiuiiiuimi'"" i ""m migg; 





'55 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




156 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiuenty-four 



£ i MiiiiiM i i i wi i n i m i n mni 



'■"I 111 """ 1 "" 




James J. Bell 



Phi Kappa Nu 

Local Founded 1 919 

Founders 
Bolivar B. O'Rear 
Dewey H. McMeans J. Ford Robinson 



Walter G. Pledger 



Fratres in Collegio 
Class of 1924. 

J. S. Brindlev Blountsville, Ala. F. P. Lasseter Albertville, Ala. 

G. O. Gibbs Ensley, Ala. Georce A. Neelev . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Turner Jordan . . . Birmingham, Ala. A. N. Willis Russellville, Ala. 



. Albertville, Ala. 
. Albertville, Ala. 



Class of 1925 

B. F. Atkins Birmingham, Ala. George R. Saxon 

W. R. Britton Anniston, Ala. H. E. Thompson 

L. G. Johnson Samson, Ala. 



Class of 1926 

A. C. Adams Chelsea, Alabama 

E. E. Allen Vernon, Alabama 

Pall Barnett Cullman, Alabama 

B. A. Buchanan Albertville, Alabama 

J. R. Bolen Jackson, Alabama 

R. A. Murchison Rockford, Alabama 

E. G. McDonough Birmingham, Alabama 

H. T. Wells Boaz, Alabama 

Class of 1927 

Alton Barton Talladega, Alabama 

HoRtON Chamblee Birmingham, Alabama 

J. M. Chappelle Birmingham, Alabama 

\V. B. Douglas Huntsville, Alabama 

C. R. Hearn Dawson, Texa- 

C. E. Henderson Cullman, Alabama 

LaFayette Kelly Eldridge, Alabama 

N. C. Lee Louisville, Alabama 

C. G. Manasco Jasper, Alabama 

L. (i. Walker Jackson, Alabama 



DeWoody Wilkinson 

J. T. Anthony 

J. J, Bell, '22 
J. ]•'.. Brewton, '22 
J. \V. Britton, '23 
E. E. Cox, '22 
H. R. Garrett, Jr. 



Alumni 
J. P. Gillespie, Jr., '23 D. H. McMi \\> 
C. A. Hassler, Jr. 



J. P. Hill, '22 

J. C. HODGENS 

w. T. Henderson 
r. w. Herring 

E. E. Johnson, '23 



(;. C. O'Kelley 
B. B. O'Rear 

J. N. Patterson, '22 
W. ( ;. Pledger 
T. E. Powell 
J. F. Robinson, '22 



. Decatur, Alabama 
W. G. SMItH, '12 

C. E. Stone, 'j; 

II. D. I'ihim \\ '2 ; 
J. C. VAUGHAN, ~2\ 
L. F. W \imis, '22 

\V. I.. Wll 1 IAMS, '23 



157 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



iiii i n i im i i i i ii i """"l'[ 



""" ! "' o 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




g, « i Mill illlllllMliiiluiNiiiiilllllllllll l llllllll l lllll lll ll l l l ll ll l i mm l iiMiiiiiii i M lll lll i n ill l ^U" T rtsgg» *^n : i m i )m il U l ln 'I ITTTTnrTiTFTT 




National Pan-Hellenic Council 

Officers 

Frank Mullins President 

j . 11. Wise Vice-President 

('. I). Riddle Secretary 

Representatives 

E. M. Brasweli Sigma Nu 

('. D. Riddle Sigma Nu 

J. II. Wise Sigma \ u 

Eugene Dawson Pi Kappa Alpha 

A. L. Head Pi Kappa Alpha 

Frank Mullins Pi Kappa Alpha 



'59 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

I IM l Mmi iiii i ii iii i i i iiiii n ii iiii i iiiiii mi i | in finn an g 




I 60 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 




Masks 



Interfraternity Club, Founded January, 1924 

Officers 

H. E. Watlington, Jr President 

Douglas M. Braswell Vice-President 

Turner Jordan Secretary 

Orlando Ogle Treasurer 

Members 

Douglas Braswell Sigma Nu 

M. R. Buckalew, Jr Sigma Nu 

E. B. Cosper Sigma Nu 

J. H. Wise Sigma Nu 

D. A. Gavlord Pi Kappa Alpha 

J. D. Kerney Pi Kappa Alpha 

Russell Tinklepaugii Pi Kappa Alpha 

H. E. Watlington, Jr Pi Kappa Alpha 

Aubrev Miree Psi Delta 

Orlando Ogle Psi Delta 

J. E. Scarbrough, Jr Psi Delta 

R. L. Wear Psi Delta 

Spurgeon Brindlf.v Phi Kappa Nu 

John Chappelle /'///' Kappa Nu 

Turner Jordan /'///' Kappa Nu 

Huev T. Wells Phi Kappa Nu 



161 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




Tiiirjum n 



^^^ 



■ 



Girls Pan-Hellenic Council 

Officers 

Virginia Hili President 

Evolyn Graves Vice-President 

Aileen Gullahorke Secretary 

LlLLlE Barnes Treasurer 

Representatives 

Virginia Hili tlpha Delia Pi 

Helen Bass llpka Delta Pi 

IRMA Parson's Delta Cam ma Sig ma 

Evolyn Graves Delia Gamma Sigma 

Dais', HOOVER Zeta Omega 

Aileen Gullahorne Zeta Omega 

I. II. I. ik BARNES Lambda Xi Delta 

Vikci\!\ MlNTER I amlhia Xi Delta 



162 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



a ^ TTnmi mii i i iii im i mH i m'iH'imiMiiiiiHHnHim i H li nim 





163 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




- . ... - ■-: ' ' , ; -'■-..- •^•;; 



I 










i. - '>i*Si*S ; .<fi'.6.'ii5*t3^^&^'.--' I ^H 



164 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



£ nyi. | iiiim i mil iii"M| | | | |l ll l l l l ll llll l l l lll n ll l l l l l l lg nmmmm 




Alpha Delta Pi 



Founded at Wesleyan Female College in 1 85 1 
Colors: Light Blue and White Flower: Single Violet 

Thirty-seven Active Chapters 
Thirty-nine Alumnae Chapters 



Founders 
Eugenia Tucker Fitzcerald Mary Evans Glass 



Octavia Rush 



K 



appa 



Chapt 



er 



Established in 1910 at Judson College 
Transferred in 191 9 to Howard College 

SOROR IN FACULTATE 
Virginia Carswell 

SoRORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1924 

Ethel Clark Falkville, Alabama 

Virginia Hill Birmingham, Alabama 

ELLIE Mae Lawley Birmingham, Alabama 

Gertrude York Jacksonville, Florida 

Class of KJ26 

Helen Bass Bessemer, Alabama 

Julia Finklea Buena Vista, Alabama 

Willie Mae Hardy Birmingham, Alabama 

Marlin Harris Birmingham, Alabama 

Evelyn Mix Birmingham, Alabama 

Helen Hurlisert Ensley, Alabama 

Elizabeth Lloyd Birmingham, Alabama 

Helen Sparks Ensley, Alabama 

Class of Kj2j 

EVELYN Clark Falkville, Alabama 

Ruin Pace Herrin, Illinois 

MARGARET PERRYMAN Birmingham, Alabama 

Elizabeth Stephenson Birmingham, Alabama 

Mai. la Jane Ketchum Birmingham, Alabama 



165 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



i ■ 



mi""""'""""h ""J"' I III II I I I IIU MJ 



Alpha Delta Pi 



Roll of Chapti rs 

Newcomb College New Orleans, Louisiana 

Louisiana State I tliversit) Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Brenau College Gainesville, Georgia 

Trinity College Durham, North Carolina 

Randolph-Macon College Lynchburg, Virginia 

Florida Woman's College Tallahassee, Florida 

Howard College Birmingham, Alabama 

University of Tennessee ECnoxville, Tennessee 

University of Texas Austin, Texas 

Southwestern University Georgetown, Texas 

University of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas 

University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri 

Kansas State College Manhattan, Kansas 

University of Colorado Boulden, Colorado 

Southern Methodist University Pallas, Texas 

University of New Mexico Albu<|uen|ue, New Mexico 

Oklahoma A. Sc M. College Stillwater, Oklahoma 

Boston University Boston, Massachusetts 

Colby College Waterville, Maine 

University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Ohio State University Columbia, Ohio 

Hanover College Hanover, Indiana 

Wittenberg College Springfield, Ohio 

Ohio University Athens, Ohio 

Ohio Weslevan Delaware, Ohio 

(ieorge Washington University Washington, District of Columbia 

University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois 

University of Iowa Iowa City, Iowa 

Lawrence College Appleton, Wisconsin 

Iowa State College Ames, Iowa 

University of Nebraska Lincoln, Nebraska 

University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin 

University of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Washington State College Pullman, Washington 

University of Washington Seattle, Washington 

University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 

Wesleyan College Macon, Georgia 

Mary Baldwin Stanton, Virginia 

Universit) of Alabama Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

Woman's College Montgomery, Alabama 

Judson College Marion, Alabama 

Winston-Salem Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



1 66 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



"■^H 



£ i jm ii m i m i i i i i iiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillll ll lllu l ll i m iu i mu i Uiiu nmiTmT"rm " ' '' "" "' mn ii l l liiMMi imim ggj-gr ^ i m i iliill l HHN lll I ll l ll """"'""""* 








167 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



"■ i uuiMMH t "" r niiiiiinjiunmumm o 




16S 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



/r^%)! 





■,V. >; ^3 K. 

lllimniiillllni nnnBarY . BjBJUjg _ jgtair-T-ft- r _; 



Delta Gamma Sigma Sorority 

Local Founded at Howard College 191 9 
Colors: Green and White Floiirr: White Rose 



Ruth Morris 



Founders 
Vera Mae Dumos 



Ruth Casey 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1924 

Nellie Gibbs Ensley, Alabama 

Evelyn Graves Fairfield, Alabama 

Loyce Hendricks Hartford, Alabama 

Willie Kirk Birmingham, Alabama 

Miriam Thornton Birmingham, Alabama 

Roberta Trechsel Birmingham, Alabama 

Jeanette Vaughn Geneva, Alabama 

Ruth Wallace Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1925 

Ruby Little Morris, Alabama 

Irma Parsons Birmingham, Alabama 

Thelma Stacy Birmingham, Alabama 

Mabel Willoughby Gordon, Alabama 

Kathleen Sloan Ensley, Alabama 

Class of 1926 

Thelma Bates Ensley, Alabama 

Jewel GRAVES Fairfield, Alabama 

Frances McNeil Birmingham, Alabama 

Grace Pass Blountsville, Alabama 

NAUFLEET SUDDUTH Birmingham, Alabama 

MARGARET COX Birmingham, Alabama 

Kei.i.oray Hili Birmingham, Alabama 

[Catherine Wii.kins Birmingham, Alabama 



169 



- 1 ! * 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




T. R. EAGLES 



170 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 

£ ]|i.. ! innr. nilll.,ll 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 U 1 1 1 1 JimimUUUU 



\-:MlW>. 





171 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

I'lnjlliilmimi .p rcj g 





I 7 2 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



g i ii iii niiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui iiiiiinii M i iN ii imii i mium i m i n i MiM""""'" i umimu i^ 




Zeta Omega 



Founded 191 6 



Colors: Green and Gold 



Flovier: Red Rose 



KAtHLEEN Clark 



Founders 

Annie Merle Haggard 

Hazel Newman 

Cecelia Cain 



Frances Martin 



SOROR IN FACULTATE 
Bennie Spinks 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1924 

Aii.een Gullahorn Ensley, Alabama 

Mildred Basenburg Birmingham, Alabama 

Mary Bunn Gay Ensley, Alabama 

Class of 1925 
Daisy Hoover Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1926 

Frances Newman Birmingham, Alabama 

Elna Almgren Ensley, Alabama 

Mary Elizabeth McPiierson East Lake, Alabama 

Hazel Cobb Birmingham, Alabama 

Cornelia Hamlin Birmingham, Alabama 



Class of 1927 



Pauline Ray . . . 
Elizabeth Sadler . 
Mary Nki.i.e Helley 
Mary Lou Marun . 
Mary Lee Morrison 
Mil i>ki d Hay . . 
Arnice Siielton 

AOILEE MaTTISON . 



. . East Lake, Alabama 

Roebuck Spring. Alabama 

. Powderlv, Alabama 

. Trussville, Alabama 

. Trussville, Alabama 

. Ensley, Alabama 

East Lake, Alabama 

Birmingham, Alabama 



>7J 






^-\ 



L J it- s »»* 

i ffT ||||in| m , ni'niW6f^, ■ Jj- _ 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




Zeta Omega Alumnae 

Bennie Spinks, Instructor, Howard College. 

Nell Hodges, Central College, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Annie Merle Haggard, Teacher, Central High School. 

Cecilia Cain, Teacher, North Avenue Pies. School, Atlanta, Ga. 

Mrs. E. M. Strickland (Ha/el Newman), Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Martin, Gadsden High School, Gadsden, Ala. 

Anna Johnston, Birmingham, Ala. 

Mrs. Bruce Mahee, North Carolina. 

Mrs. Robert Nettles ( Hattie Hope), Fairfield, Ala. 

Mrs. Joe Debardlaben (Frances Sheldon), Ensley, Ala. 

Mrs. Hodge (Mary Brown Buckshaw), Birmingham, Ala. 

Aileen Croswell, Manchester, Ga. 

Kathleen Clark, Birmingham, Ala. 

Mamie Myrtle Price, Bessemer High School. 

Mrs. Arthur Duke (Mildred Clapp). 

Mayone Gilmore, Sicard, Ala. 

Mary Hord Wilson, Birmingham, Ala. 

Norine Lyles, Ashland, Ala. 

Marie Clark, Birmingham, Ala. 

Mrs. Fred B. White (Ruby Arnold), Fnsley, Ala. 

Mary Lucille Ezell, Student Judson College. 

Mable Hodges, Birmingham, Ala. 

Helen Lane, Teacher, Hellin, Ala. 



'7* 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



g n m in' W ll " 'iiiiiniiirnmH^iTiiiiiiitiiniiiiiiiHiii li HimiinTTTT i mtninir i ] i ^viMrr" l ""Mim . iimTimM i nnm ii rm i ^ l 





175 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



uiimiumihUhiih ^mfBfftf n 




i 7 6 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



^ , -p m. M i i 11 L M UI I M II I ! I bill Lll l ll l IIU I Ml 1 11 l l ll l l l lll lm i l l um nmTTTnr 




Lambda Xi Delta Sorority 

Local Founded at Howard College April 13, 1922 
Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: White Carnation 



Edna Pate 



Founders 
Bertha Howard 
Virginia Mister 



Jessie L. Freeman 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1924 

Lillie C. Barnes Birmingham, Alabama 

Alma Smith East Lake, Alabama 

Rosalee Smith East Lake, Alabama 

JEWELL Hacood Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1925 

M. Elizabeth Foster Birmingham, Alabama 

VIRGINIA C. Minter ■ Birmingham, Alabama 

Susie A. Minter East Lake, Alabama 

Class of 1926 

Thelma Bullington East Lake, Alabama 

Evelyn Hern Wylam, Alabama 

Anna Kenda Birmingham, Alabama 

Johnnie Lee Poole Birmingham, Alabama 

Louise Wall Huntsville, Alabama 

Helen White Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1927 

Frances Frazer Birmingham, Alabama 

Eoline McCullar Carbon Hill, Alabama 

Louise Douglas Birmingham, Alabama 

JUANITA Robinette Birmingham, Alabama 

Willie McCormack Birmingham, Alabama 

Emma Barlowe Huntsville, Alabama 

Virginia Wall Huntsville, Alabama 

Eloise Milstead Boyles, Alabama 



J 77 




i&L 






"W-N 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




i!!!!i [i M«l»™ i 'luuiil lluuiiilluiiliiinil ll l l l l l l l li iii;i i Hi i i n nun ,..,,, „ 




I 7 8 






i— ; 



ist 



ns 





COLLEGE YEAR 



make the most of what we 
yet may sfiend, 
ore we too into the Dust de- 
scend; 

into Dust and under Dust 
to Vie 



wine, sans song, sans singer 
and — sans Find! 

— Rubaiyal of Omar Khayam. 



CHAPTER V 




> '" 








Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




>5 









H 





Jt 



c3 

IN 
CD 
Ml 
CD 

III 
CD 

II 

CD 



CD 

II 

CD 

III 

O 

III 

CD 



CD 

I! 
CD 

Ml 

CD 



r 



\ 



a 
a 



1 

I 
1 

1 

i 



H 




c>0 



^L Ellis Cobb 




falilee ^Silii^: 




She ^Birmingham *Nettf* (Siu) 

The Souths Greatest Ncwsp»pcb ^ , , ^ 




Ethel (lark, llest All-Kouml 

Her fineness la like that of un- 
polished sold, not so glaring 
thai it becomes repulsive, but 
valuable Just the same, she 
has that wonderful ability 
which allows her to advise, to 
sympathize, to understand. 
Every student knows her; 
every student loves her. 



\ 



.'PDAYS bUNDA/S 
AND HOLIDAYS 



i 




»ll HcElheney, Prettlesl 

She must have been the In- 
spiration for "Wonderful One." 
Students come and go, but 
Nell's title remains unchal- 
lenged and unchanged. l"«>r 
two consecutive years she has 

i 11 voted tln> prettiest girl at 

Howard. What chance do poor 
men have \. h.-i women have 
eyes like Nell's? 




Fred White, Best All-Kouml 

Here he is — football star, poet, 
playwright, musician. actor. 
and a well-known writer of 
ballads and song hits, it" you 
best that list of accomplish- 
ments, bring cm your horse. 
Some one has suggested that 
he be placed on the payroll of 
the college as a general utility 
man of luture student bodies. 




••Hum" Stevens, Uest Looking 
Man mid l(i'»t Athlete 

What is more handsome than 
a handsome man ? what chance 

has a girl When such a man 
carries a Dashing smile like 
"Hani's." and takes all the 
tdory possible on the gridiron, 
basketball court, and baseball 

diamond at the same time? He 
may be a bit frosty cm the 
dome, but that comes from 
hard study ( ? ) . of COUI Be. 

"Hani" has been selected as 

Hi.- best all-round athlete at 
Howard again this year. This 
is twice "Ham" has had this 
honor. Every one congratu- 
lates tin- athletic council on 
their choice, and we hope 
"Ham" continues to do the 
work which will win more 
■ lips. 




tJene Dawson, Most lte|>re*ent- 
ative 

If you want it done, send Qene. 
In the short .-pace- of tun year! 
he has made himself known as 
the most dependable boy on 
the campus. 11 is future career 
will be bright Indeed, if he con- 
tinues to travel the course- he 

has followed so well thus far. 



CIAVUIE SECTION + THt IIIMINOHAI NEWJ * TU Wi. O-w— Mm 



A 


V - 1 ^ I 



"Bill" Kirk, Most Dependable 

Every institution, every organ- 
ization, every individual must 
have something to lean upon. 
•Hill ' carries i lie burdens of the 
faculty, student body and many 
organizations. Someone has sug- 
gested that when "Bill" stands 
to receive her diploma that 
"Ko< 1; of Ages" be sung. How- 
ard may well be proud of 
"Hill." She is one of the most 
outstanding girls in the college. 




I red Curler, Brainiest Man 

upon him. gentle reader. 
Ho makes A's as a matter ol 
course, l >oea bo bone tor t bom ? 

\o. sir, bo is not a Sponge 
Which drinks up knowledge, 
but lie is olio whose brain just 

naturally gives up knowledge 

Ol it ..i\n i.l. Hi ill ia lit alol 

congenial, Fred is a verj pop- 
ular student. 




Georgre Yarbrough, Best Poli- 
tician 

Behold the politician of How- 
ard! We are templed to say 
that George is "first of all ibis 
and first of all thai." The truth 
of all the matter is thai he has 

taken a leading pari in every 
activity with which he lias 
been associated. His travel and 
■ i" rience has made him par- 
ticularly able in all fields — lit- 
erary, athletic, love and- poli- 
ties. Here's to you. George! 
Nothing succeeds like success. 




Frank Mulliiis, Must Popular 
Boy 

Who is it at Howard that does 
not know Frank? Who is it 
that does not like him? He 
leads the cheers. He sings our 
solos. He laughs ami jokes I or 
us when we are down and out. 
Hi' is King of the Hoboes, and 
an all-round likeable fellow. 
When he leaves, who is go 
to raise a noise .at 2 in the 
A. M. ? 




■•Li/." Loyd, Cleveresl 

Who has ever met "I.tz" that 
did not remember tin Introduc- 
tion and name '.' She just oat - 
uiall\ causes one to remember 
her. Her girlish smile, lot 

ej es. ami her Bl i 
personality, all combine to 
\ out stub a thing as forgetful 

ness on the pal ( ol .11 li. i 

friend or chance observer. No 

gill at Howard is more wlcl.lv 
known than "1.1/.." 



•»ar**i i.iri ii. i 



* THlBIHMIHUHAaMIWS * f»» I 



CIAVUII 11CTION 





Marl in Harris, Most Original 

M.irlin may never Invent a new method of 
transcontinental transportation, hut she can in- 
vent more original expressions, more original 
jokes per minute of time than any other ten 
girls combined. It Is not mental ability, either; 
it is just that natural, likeable quality which 
Is just Marlin's. Every one knows her; ever] 
one likes her: every one enjoys being around 
wherever she may be. 



Lee Head, Biggest Flirt 

Don't believe him, girls. He is opposed to truth 
telling w here you are concerned. He Is as adept 
at flirting as he is at catching baseball, and 
he Is going to the big show this season. Then, 
too. Lee has had so much experience — and expe- 
rience counts in a battle of wits. Lee is a pop- 
ular fellow at Howard for more reasons than 
we have space to enumerate. 





Julia 1 in I, leu 

Gaze upon her. but do not touch her. lest some- 
thing terrible should happen, she Is so ex- 
quisitely dainty, bo petite, so demure, that she 
is the despair and the delight of everyone at 
the same moment. Julia is a rare combination 
Df all the delightful traits which make the 
Imagination revolve about innocence and purity. 



Harold Tinklepaugh, Biggest Bluffer 

When a fellow can come to college and bluff 
his way into a class presidency, as well as vari- 
ous other honors, along with A's and B's with- 
out study, you must hand it to him. He Is good 
— that's all. Harold is a popular student and 
should make good in a big way. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Ttuenty-four 



B i |iiii| iiiiiiiiiiiihii iiiiiiiii"iiiiii''iiiiiiiiiiiiii ii i i inm i i i i i i ii i iiii i i iii i] ii i iiii i ii i " mi T ^T ^, 





aVerid 



&x 



SEPTEMBER 
Tin- gang's all here. Regis- 



A merry welcome to 



4 — First day. 

(ration. 
5 — Formal opening, 
ii — V. W. ('. A. party. 

all tin- girls. 
14 — Faculty reception. Everybody comes t" 

know everybody else and it seems like 

that old Howard spirit is bursting out. 
15 — First "Crimson." Seems good to see the 

college new a in print. 

NOVEMBER 
15 — Howard da\ at the convention. Oh, boj ' 

We made Mime showing. We knew what 



we wanted and we ''brought home the 
bacon." 

21 — Howard Crave prepared by Birmingham- 
Southern. 

23 — Annual pep meeting. Peppiest ever. 
Loving cup presented to Colonel Berrv. 
Rah! Rah! Rah! 

24 — Big game — 6-6. Yea, Howard. Eat 'em! 
Eat 'em ! Eat 'em ! 

DECEMBER 
13 — Annual stunt night. Freshman won. 
15 — Santa Claus is coming, so let's pack up 
and catch the first train for home. 

JANUARY 
3 — Back again and how full we are of turkey 

and the blues, n' everything. 
15 — Clouds look heavy — exams. 
18 — We grinned and endured it and now its 

all over. Hope for the best. 
19 — New semester. We see some new faces. 

Welcome to "Ole Howard." 
29 — Founder's day and reception. Eighty-sec 

ond year. 

FEBRUARY 

7 — (ilee Club recital. 

8 — Dr. Robertson ol the University of Chi 
cago pays us a \ Nit. 
25 — Dramatic art class program. 

MARCH 

12 and 13 — Dr. Lyons ot Harvard delivers 
■•eiies nl lectures. 

13 — College entertains first semester honor 
students at Tutwiler luncheon. 

MAY 

25 — Commencement Sunday. Sermon In Pi. 

J. E. Dillard. 

26 — Alumni day. Reunion ol Class ot i<n>4. 
Rev. J. (>. Colley, superintendent ot Ala 
bama Baptist Orphans' Home, speaker at 
alumni luncheon at trustees' meeting. 

27 — Commencement address bj Dr. F. B, 
Fowler, Professor English I iterature at 
University ot Louisville, former!) Pro 

lesvoi ol Fnglish in Howard. 



■m 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

nrTm>r»« a»~ 1 1 mi | mimi I "|V ||||| |"' | 1 | M II II III II I U I MI in I i||imillllllllil iiinliii g 




192 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



g i nn in iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i iii iii i i iiiii iiiimm 




Stunt Night 



' ^3 N event which has been a feature of college activities for the past two years 

> A ^/1i and one which promises to be such in the future is the annual "Stunt Night." 
That's the time when we have the chance to display our class spirit. Each 
class gives a stunt and each class vies with the others in an effort to win the trophy. 
The event this year was a grand success and class spirit was what everybody had 
that night. 

The Freshman stunt was divided into two parts. The first part looked back- 
ward to us; in fact, it was backward. All the representatives wore their clothes 
"hind part before," and — sh, they were two faced. They gave us a number of read- 
ings and the human organ, except for an occasional sticking of the keys, gave us the 
most musical music we have ever heard. The second part of their stunt consisted 
of a "silent drama" called "Wild Nell." It was odd and clever. 

The Sophomore stunt was a "Deestrick Skule." We were permitted to see the 
different members of the faculty as they were in "ye goode olde days" as they went 
to the "little red schoolhou.se with the book and slate." Although this was the usual 
thing, it was carried out in a very unusual way. It was an old song to a new tune. 

The Juniors went on a camping trip, and my, what a time they had ! And the 
good part of it all was they had their camp right where we could get the good out 
of all that went on. We enjoyed the potato race 'n everything, and especially did 
we enjoy taking the ride in Dr. Chapman's "flivver." 

The Seniors presented a scene from the Crimson office called "The Freshman 
Gets a Job." This scene was written especially for the occasion by the president of 
the class. Miniature Crimsons were distributed by the "Newsies" and then the 
show began. We didn't know it was in the Seniors, but it was. and it came out — 
and very cleverly, too. The stunt was well done and entirely original. 

All the stunts deserve the highest commendation, but the judges declared that the 
Freshmen bad won. "Render unto the Freshmen the things that are theirs," and we 
know they will try to repeat their victory next year. Remember: Stunt night is that 

perpetual motion machine scientists have been trying to invent. And our 

grew and will continue to grow. 



193 




J, 



m mnmnam * ^M f .^«uu*-*- -» .* 



i lUluuuiuuz 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

""'""" If I l i rVI 'l ^i i ^ ' ^l l ll ll l l lll l l lll ll lll l l iiiiiiiiiiiifiiiii.ii i i i i i ii i .i N iiintn^ ^ g 



3n mrninru of tbnsr mini 
Utrkrit ambition tn liaur tljrir 
ptrtitrra maftp. 



»94 




Entre Nous, Nineteen T xventy-jour 



Birmin£han\» 

Nashville- 

eJaek§pnviU&-> 

New Orleans 




^XAiere §tyle am .Quality Predominate 




I922.-1924- FIRST AVENUE 

B IRM IN O HAM .ALABAMA 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




111 ■■"ii i n i iH]r"u i m iiii iiiiiiii iii iii i ii ii i iii ) iii iiiii ii''"iii||iviii' ■ '""mnnimr n 



B. M. CHENOWETH & COMPANY 



Wholesale and Retail 



GOLF ACCESSORIES 

SPORT CLOTHING 

FISHING TACKLE 

GUNS AND AMMUNITION 



CUTLERY 

FLASHLIGHTS 

ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 

PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT 



Phone Main 1590 



103 North Twentieth Street 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



a ,i iiii pi i mn\mnn ii inn uiii '»"U""'""m imi mm i n Di 




111 1 1 m Ti n r nm ii m i M ili um M T i rTn nm mii n t HJJ^ , 



A THE FINEST 
OF THEM 
ALL 



CROMER 

ARTCRAFT PEN 
COMPANY 



BIRMINGHAM 
ALABAMA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

VAUGHN 

REALTY 

COMPANY 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



GRADUATION 
FLOWERS 

Corsage and Arm 
Bouquets 

ARTISTICALLY DESIGNED BY 

THE BLOSSOM 
SHOP 

Main 8091 

505 North Twentieth Street 
Moulton Hotel 



J 



emison service 



To furnish the people of this 
community homes in which to 
live and places in which to do 
business; to finance dwellings, 
apartments, business property 
ami improved farms and to do 
it efficiently and adequately 
these are the JBMISON ideals 
that have bach of them an un- 
broken record of progress. 







JiiU- 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 







GRADUATION 
GIFTS 

Our stock embraces everything which 
is essential to the personal appear- 
ance, or to the general use, of the 
college student. 

An Opportunity to Serve 
You Will Be 
Appreciated 

REID LAVVSON 

Incorporated 

308 North Twentieth Street 

"What We Say It Is 
It Is" 



Judson College 

MARION. ALABAMA 

A High-Grade College 
for Young Women 

FOUNDED 1838 

Standard course; leading to the Bach- 
elor of Arts and Bachelor of Music De- 
grees. 

Instruction also given in Art. Expres- 
sion. Home Economics, Physical Culture, 
and Teacher Training. 

A model college home, pleasant social 
life, and the very best moral and reli- 
gious influences. 

For catalogue and other information, 
address 

PRESIDENT E. V. BALDY 

A.M., D.D. 




YOU JUST KNOW SHE 
MADE IT WITH 

Roller^* 
Champion 

"The Flour th: Best Cool ( s Use" 



College Candies and Party Favors 
a Specialty 

MARIE LOUISE 
CANDY SHOP 

1907 Third Ave. Birmingham, Ala. 
TEA, SODA. LUNCHEON 



NEWMAN'S CLEANERIES 

Always a Representative on the Campus 
to Call for and Deliver at Any Time 

VISIT OUR MODERN PLANT 



Office and Plan!. 5601 Second Ave., S. 
East Lake Branch, 116 S. 77th Street. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 

B , n„ ,|, i ii ii i i . iM i n ii i n i i iii i iii i i iili l l llll l l l ii in u i iiii i iiiii i i M iiiii m i i u i i ii i i i i i Miiimiiiiiiiiut L1 -^SP^^i|.iiiiii l iuil l l N l imrnTC 



?M T¥ ~\ 



Birmingham Distributors 

OF 

MERRY WIDOW 

AND 

FLORA FLOURS 

LEE BROTHERS 

Wholesale Grocers 

2321 Morris Avenue 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Don't Fail to See 



Our Beautiful Graduation 
Gifts Before You Make Your 
Selection. 



A. & A. ASH 

Jewelers and Opticians 

1921 Second Avenue 

"The Best Place to Shop 
After All" 



Foremost In Fashion 
FAR Most In Value 



BLACH'S 



Apparel for 

Ladies, Gentlemen, and 

the Boys 



INSURANCE 

FIRE 

LIABILITY 

AUTOMOBILE 

SURETY BONDS 

ACCIDENTS 

HEALTH 
BURGLARY 

A. D. Smith, Hamilton 
& Glover 

INSURANCE AGENCY 

221-225 Age-Herald Build ng 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



"M^ 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




HIGH ART CLOTHES 

From Maker to Wearer 

SOLVE YOUR CLOTHING PROBLEM 

J. B. STRAUSS & COMPANY 



BIRMINGHAM BRANCH 



2007 THIRD AVE. 



If You Wish Coffee In Your 
Home That Is "Just a Little 
Better" Buy 

DIXIE CLUB 
COFFEE 

FROM YOUR GROCER 



Becco Potato Chips 

At All Grocers 



MANUFACTURED BY 

Beck Candy & Grocery 
Company 



INSURE WITH HOWARD MEN 



See our NEW POLICY. It pays for the insured Ten Dollars 
per $1,000.00 per month during his lifetime, with no further 
premium required, in the event of total or permanent dis- 
ability by any disease or accident, and the face value of the 
policy at death. In addition to this it pays twice the face 
value of the policy for accidental death. 

The Jefferson Standards Rates are Right 



W. A. 



ALBERT LEE 



BERRY & SMITH 

GENERAL AGENTS FOR ALABAMA 



401 2-3 Age-Herald Building 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



W, > Bk\ 




Smart Men Look Smart 
OR SHOULD 

For the man who desires to be well 
groomed smart haberdashery is always the 
most practical. 

THE TOGGERY SHOP 

Haberdashery of Character 
200 North Twentieth Street 



FORDS 

RENT THEM FROM 

WOODLAWN FORD 
RENTAL COMPANY 

G. C. Curlee, Prop. 

108 North Fifty-fifth Street 

Phone Woodlawn 1551 



WILLIAMS 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
COMPANY 

2627 Avenue G Phone Main 7989 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



GOLDEN FLAKE 
POTATO CHIPS 

In bulk or in packages for parties or 
lunches. 

MAGIC CITY FOOD PRODUCTS 
COMPANY 

1716 Fifteenth Ave.. N. Phone H. 582 

Birmingham, Alabama 



Juake Our Store Your Headquarters 



GREENE DRUG COMPANY 



Corner Empire Building 
FIRST AVENUE AND TWENTIETH STREET 



TELEPHONE MAIN 516 






■^jSk lf^L^&>~. Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS 

AT 

WAHOUMA DRUG 
COMPANY 

"The Store of Quality" 

Bell Phone 913 Woodlawn 
6510 First Avenue 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Prescriptions Carefully 

Compounded by an 

Expert Pharmacist 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HARRIS PRODUCE 
COMPANY 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



P. C. RATLIFF & SON 

INSURANCE 

THE PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

Assets Over $225,000,000 
P. C. RATLIFF & SON, General Agents 

1003 Age-Herald Building, Birmingham, Ala. 

A Perm Mutual Premium, less a Penn Mutual Dividend, purchasing a 
Penn Mutual Policy containing Penn Mutual values, makes an Insurance 
Proposition which, in the sum of All Its Benefits, is unsurpassed for net 
low cost, and care of all interest of all members. It is best not just one 
way, but all ways, and always. Back of it is a seventy-six-year reputation 
for fair dealing with all its policyholders, whether continuing, withdraw- 
ing, maturing or dying. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 







DUCK INN 

k THE COLLEGE MAN'S HANG OUT" 

Handles a Complete Line of Supplies. We Also Cash Your Checks. Our 
Pleasure Is to Serve You. 

G. E. Brown, Prop. 



PRINTING 


Quality — Service — Price 


ALPHA PRESS, Inc. 


Printers and Publishers 


FRANK A. SMITH 


Phone Main 310 


2330 Third Avenue 



"DRENNENS" 



Your Kind 

of a 

Store 




THE MEN'S SHOP 

223 Twentieth Street 



PRATT 

CONSOLDATED 

COAL CO. 

Miners of High-Grade 
STEAM AND DOMESTIC 

COAL 



American Trust Building 
Telephone Main 4640 



,r~ 



■T-li 



r\ 



,3*;^ 



■ i 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




Conservative Banking 

American 

Trust & Saving 

Bank 

Member of Federal Resei-ve 
System 

Capital 

$1,000,000 

Surplus and Profit? 

$650,000 



E. E Forbes & Sons 
Piano Co. 

Where Prices are Lower 

1922 THIRD AVENUE 



"PURITY AT PARKE R'S" 

FLOWERS 

FOR COMMENCEMENT 

— She expects flowers, of course — pret 
them at Parker's, home-Krown, fresh ami 
beautiful. 

P. S. 

— And candy once a week, at least, is the 

proper thing. 

PARKER'S DRUG STORE 

Woodward Bldg., the Convenient Corner 



DEMAND 

ISIS CREAM 

Perfect Cold Cream 

Vanishing (Peroxide) 
Cream 

FOR SALE AT ALL 
DRUG STORES 

Price 35c per Jar 

MADE IN BIRMINGHAM 



Tutwiler Hotel 



Phone Main 447 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 

TUTWILER 
FLOWER SHOP 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

FRASIER NURSERIES, Inc., Prop. 
Mrs. T. H. Hagen, M«r. 



E. C. Adams & Co. 

CARLOT DISTRIBUTORS 

Sealdsweet Oranges and 
Grape Fruit 

r>09-10 American Trust Building 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

a . .t. nn iiiiii M i i M iii m ii i "" i i iiiiiiiii i iii m iiiiiiiiii m iii i iiiiiliiiiiimnillignnn pg 




THRIFT 

IS AN EDUCATION THAT 

IS NOT LEARNED 

IN SCHOOL 

Or From Printed Books 

The Most Practical 
Way 

IS TO 

DO YOUR SHOPPING 

AT 

PIZITZ 




WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF HOTEL AND CAFE SUPPLIES 

WOOD-FRUITTICHER GROCERY 
COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

TELEPHONE MAIN 8114 



2321 FIRST AVENUE 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




§ Bi inn n im 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

luiiiMimni iiiim n urn m l ■ 



uumm muM""! ■ m m 



Wheeler Students 
Cel the Best 

Positions'' 



GIVE "OPPORTUNITY" 
A BOOST 



Now that you have started on the road to success, give 
"opportunity" an added impetus — make sure that your 
education pays you for the weary grind of many hours 
you have spent in study. You have the foundation for 
success — your need, now, is the application of your 
knowledge along the lines that sweep away all resist- 
ance. There is nothing that will give you a better start 
in the commercial world than a 



WHEELER BUSINESS 
COURSE 

Bus.ness men prefer Wheeler graduates, because they 
know that Wheeler students are not only more thoroughly 
taught, but taught more than most other business schools. 
They know that each student is given personal attention, 
such as best fits the individual need, thereby developing 
personality and ability of distinctive character. They 
know also, that Wheeler Business College zealously 
guards the future of its students by its thorough require- 
ments before graduation. 



Send for Our Thirty-sixth 
Annual Catalog 

Wheeler Business College 

Fully Accredited by National BIRMINGHAM, 

Association of Accredited Commercial Schools ALA. 



A SUMMER SCHOOL IF YOU PREFER IT 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



g .| | iii | mil llllllllliillliiiiiiiilllll ll ll l lll ll lll llll l ll llll l llll l MM I IiMiiM i mm '" " " ■ ■ ■ i " UUUJUJ^j 




-<, tfelU'i 






SPECIALIZED 
CLOTHES 



For the Youth and Beauty 
of Alabama, as Typified by 
the Student Body of 



HOWARD 

Loveman, Joseph 
and Loeb 



Everybody Enjoys Attending 

SOUTHSIDE 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

llth Ave. and 19th St., S. 

REV. J. E. DILLARD, D.D. 
Pastor 

REV. B. F. GILES, D.D. 

Assistant Pastor 

"A Church of the People 

For the People 

And By the 

People" 



McGOUGH'S 
BETTER BREAD 



•f? 



McGOUGH BAKERIES 

2113 Second Avenue 
729 N. 26th Street 



This Space Contributed By 

COLLINS AND 
COMPANY 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



Birmingham, Alabama 



<c~\ 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




When the World Puts 
You on the Scales 



With commencement comes the first 
real step into the lists of life's hattle. 
How well you fare in the tilt, how many 
of the names you win, depends largely 
upon the equipment you carry with you. 

Mentally you are "turned out," hut 
your physical equipment depends upon 
how you are dressed. Years of outfitting 
many of the champions of life's engage- 
ments hrs perfected this store in the art 
of dressing men and women to look 
their best. 

Our store should become your apparel 
headquarters, if you are not already en- 
joying the advantages such a connection 
offers. 



Odum, Bowers & White 



1915-1917 Third Avenue 



Apparel for Men and Women 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

CATANZANO 
BROTHERS 



GROCERIES OF ALL 

KINDS 



1822 Fourth Avenue, North 
Birmingham, Ala. 



O'NEILL'S 

2020 Second Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

CHINA AND GLASS 
MERCHANTS 



China Dinner Sets $6.95 to $200.00 

Cut Glassware 50c to $50.00 

(Wm. A. Rogers Celebrated Silverware) 
Rogers Teaspoons, per set __ 75c to $6.00 

Rogers Tablespoons, per set 

$1.50 to $12.00 

Rogers Knives, extra plates, per set. $3.00 
Rogers Forks, extra plates, per set- $3.00 



We carry the largest stock of 
Dining; Room and Kitchen Equip- 
ment for Colleges and Hotels in 
the South. 



Send Your Family Wash 
To the Laundry 

Buy a Laundry Coupon Book and Save 

Trouble Making Change with 

the Driver 

LAUNDRY COUPON 
SALES OFFICE 

Geo. E. Driver, Secretary 
2008 First Avenue 



The Alabama Baptist 

Published by the 
ALABAMA BAPTIST CONVENTION 

L. L. Gwaltney, Editor 

PRICE $2.00 PER YEAR 

519-520 Chamber of Commerce Building 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



£ miiTin inn m i n i mw i ^^w in ii M i n i M iii i i mi ii i i ini i ini"iMi | M|i n iiMi | | ii ' i nmn ii i ai^ 







EVERYTHING OUR NAME IMPLIES TO PRESERVE AND BEAUTIFY 

THE HOME 

Birmingham Paint and Glass Company 



2021 Fourth Avenue, North 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Neal's Place— Right Near the College 

I Always Want to serve the College Trade. A Good Barber and a Nice 
Place. Come in to See Me 



J. T. Rhodes 






J. Elmer Rhodes 


First Avenue Coal fe? Lumber Co. 






LONG 


LEAF 


PINE LUMBER 




All K.nds 


of Buildir 


g Material, 


Laths, Shingles, and Domestic Coa 






Office 


and Yards, 6424 First Avenue 




East Lake C 


ar Line 




Phone Woodlawn 


56 



SCHOOL JEWELRY 

We specialize in the manufacture of Class Rings, Class Pins, Invita- 
tions, and all kinds of Athletic Charms. 

We are official jewelers for practically all of the leading High Schools 
and Colleges of the State. 

Write or wire us and we will have our representative call on you with 
a complete line of samples. 

We invite comparison. 

JAFFE JEWELRY COMPANY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



r\ 



ii 






>!^-N 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 




THE 

Birmingham Arms 
& Cycle Co. 

ESTABLISHED 1880 

Rejoices in nearly a half cen- 
tury's service to Southern sport- 
dom. 

It's not so much how many we 
serve, but how well we serve. 

Everything for Every Sport 

Mail Orders Filled Same Day 
Received 

BIRMINGHAM ARMS & 
CYCLE CO. 

2017 Third Avenue 
Birmingham, Alabama 



When You 
Think of Drinks 



THINK OF 



BURCHFIEL 



A COMPLETE LINE OF 

Drugs, Stationery, Toilet 

Articles, Fountain Pens, 

Fine Candies 



E. G. BURCHFIEL 

Woodlawn 1003 100 South 77th St. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



CAN YOU MAKE GOOD 
COFFEE? 

The Secret Is in the Coffee Itself 




A Smile in Every Sip 

Royal Cup, with its flavor and 
freshness, delights all who try it. 

Buy Royal Cup and realise how 
n >ar perfection Coffee can be. 

BATTERTON COFFEE CO. 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 




I )tf^\ 






Clothes Quarters 

For Young Men 

LESS EXPENSE 
MORE VALUE 

Take the "El" 

Klothes Shoppe 

Incorporated 

UPSTAIRS 207'/ 2 N. 19TH ST. 

FRED THELEN, Mgr. 



TYLER 
GROCERY CO. 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



Tyler's Best Brands 
Good Things to Eat 



COAL 

STEAM 

DOMESTIC 

BLACKSMITH 




COKE 

FOUNDRY 

FURNACE 

DOMESTIC NUT 



From Three Producing Fields 

ALABAMA— TENNESSEE— KENTUCKY 

D. H. BROWN & COMPANY 

BIRMINGHAM — ATLANTA 



■ 






Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 




TURNER STUDIO COMPANY 

WISHES TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE COURTESY OF 

THE ENTRE-NOUS STAFF 

IN SELECTING THEM AS 

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

TWENTIETH STREET AND FOURTH AVENUE 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



GIBBS-FORT DRUG 
COMPANY 

A GOOD DRUG STORE 

Filth Avenue and 20th Street 
PHONE MAIN 8211 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



Hynds-Upshaw Paint h 
Glass Co., Inc. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
DEALERS 

2118 Second Ave. Phone M. 8049 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



COLLEGE MEN AND 
COLLEGE GIRLS 

Can Always Depend on the Apparel That 
Comes from This Good Store 

"SAKS" 

Alabama's Leading Style Store 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



JAMES WALKER 

REAL ESTATE 

Agent for Roebuck Springs 
Land Company 



Office 7708 Underwood Ave. 
Phone Woodlawn 732 




Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



BOOKKEEPING, CIVIL SERVICE 
SHORTHAND 

Telephone Main 7271 

ALVERSON 

BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

Robert E,. Alverson, President 

2019-2021 First Avenue 
Birmingham, Ala. 

TYPEWRITING — SECRETARIAL 
HIGHER ACCOUNTING 




£& (*M « ^JLnnnam^ Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



HOWARD COLLEGE 



A STANDARD COLLEGE 
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS 



OWNED AND CONTROLLED BY 

THE BAPTISTS OF ALABAMA 



In choosing a college the graduate of the high school naturally 
prefers to go to an institution that is alive and progressive. 
Howard College is growing steadily every year in numbers 
and influence. This is due to the character of the college 
life and to the splendid instruction offered in the class rooms. 



Howard College Prides Itself on Being the 

Best Institution for General Education 

in This Section of the South 



For Catalogue and Other Information, Address 

JOHN C. DAWSON, President 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 




COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Tiventy-four 



AutograpKs 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 



U 



\i i 



^ 




Autographs 






MM )£l s< 



^*M <"»iuJ*". ■r^ay'nn^itiiiiuinrnmTT' 



Entre Nous, Nineteen Twenty-four 

i "|| M"»M i iii iii m iiiiiiii iii i i iii i iii iiiiiiiiiii|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii HII I I IIII IH Q 




Final Appreciation 




HfTlE wish to express our appreciation to all who have helped so ably to make 
tn this volume a realitj ; to Turner Studio for the good quality of the pictures; 
to Central Engraving Company for its most efficient service and inestimable 
advice; to the students for their co-operation in picture making; to Professor Burns 
for his constructive criticism, especially in the Senior division; to the president of 
the student body who gave so graciously of his time and contributed greatly to the 
literary value of the book; to Freshman Warren for his excellent service in typing; 
to each member of the staff for his work; to those friends on whom the editor has 
so frequently called, and to those who have listened so sympathetically to our numerous 
tales of hard work. 

We must realize that many hands have been concerned almost directly in the 
making of this volume, and to the managers must be given not the whole credit for 
the successful outcome nor the entire responsibility for all mistakes, but some must 
go to the photographer, the engravers, the printers and the students. 

Now that we have our annuals, let's be happy in the memories which they bring 
forth.